2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155453
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The effects of scheduled bed rest
Abstract:
The effects of scheduled bed rest
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Fox, Mary T., RN, BScN, MSc, PhD(c)
P.I. Institution Name:York University
Title:Lecturer
[Research Presentation] This study examined the effects of scheduled bed rest on orthostatic intolerance, impaired sleep quality, and physical and cognitive fatigue for patients in chronic care hospitals. A cross-sectional comparative design was used. Comparisons were made between patients who were not on scheduled bed rest and those who were on a moderate (2 to 4 days/week) or a high dose (5 to 7 days/week). The sample included 66 patients of a chronic care hospital, who required assistance to ambulate out of bed and were able to communicate in English, provide informed consent and respond to questions. The data were obtained through individual interviews and blood pressure assessments. Orthostatic intolerance was measured by: (a) the difference in recumbent and sitting systolic blood pressure, and (b) a self-report Likert type scale. Sleep quality was measured using the Sleep Impairment Index. Physical and cognitive fatigue were measured using the respective subscales of Sidani's Fatigue Scale. Scheduled bed rest was measured by its dose i.e., the number of days that the patient is on bed rest in any given week. Comparisons between groups were examined by ANOVA. Post-hoc tests, using Bonferroni adjustment for Type I error, indicated significant differences in means between (1) the comparative and high (p = .001) and the moderate and high bed rest dose group (p = .01) on the self-report Likert type scale, (2) the comparative and high dose groups (p = .05) and the moderate and high dose groups (p = .05) on physical fatigue, and (3) the comparative and high dose groups (p = .05), and the moderate and high dose groups (p = .05) on cognitive fatigue. There were no significant differences in orthostatic intolerance as measured by systolic blood pressure. Research and practice implications are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe effects of scheduled bed resten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155453-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The effects of scheduled bed rest</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fox, Mary T., RN, BScN, MSc, PhD(c)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">York University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">maryfox@yorku.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] This study examined the effects of scheduled bed rest on orthostatic intolerance, impaired sleep quality, and physical and cognitive fatigue for patients in chronic care hospitals. A cross-sectional comparative design was used. Comparisons were made between patients who were not on scheduled bed rest and those who were on a moderate (2 to 4 days/week) or a high dose (5 to 7 days/week). The sample included 66 patients of a chronic care hospital, who required assistance to ambulate out of bed and were able to communicate in English, provide informed consent and respond to questions. The data were obtained through individual interviews and blood pressure assessments. Orthostatic intolerance was measured by: (a) the difference in recumbent and sitting systolic blood pressure, and (b) a self-report Likert type scale. Sleep quality was measured using the Sleep Impairment Index. Physical and cognitive fatigue were measured using the respective subscales of Sidani's Fatigue Scale. Scheduled bed rest was measured by its dose i.e., the number of days that the patient is on bed rest in any given week. Comparisons between groups were examined by ANOVA. Post-hoc tests, using Bonferroni adjustment for Type I error, indicated significant differences in means between (1) the comparative and high (p = .001) and the moderate and high bed rest dose group (p = .01) on the self-report Likert type scale, (2) the comparative and high dose groups (p = .05) and the moderate and high dose groups (p = .05) on physical fatigue, and (3) the comparative and high dose groups (p = .05), and the moderate and high dose groups (p = .05) on cognitive fatigue. There were no significant differences in orthostatic intolerance as measured by systolic blood pressure. Research and practice implications are discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:51:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:51:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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