2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155458
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Grounded Theory of Disaster Response of Honduran Survivors
Abstract:
A Grounded Theory of Disaster Response of Honduran Survivors
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Weiss, Jo Anne, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Florida Atlantic University
Title:Assistant Professor
Following a disaster many people want to provide assistance to the survivors, however, they frequently do not know how to do this effectively. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the Disaster Response Theory, which was developed from a research project done in Honduras following Hurricane Mitch. The purpose of the grounded theory research was to generate a substantive theory that explained how Hondurans thought about their survival of Hurricane Mitch and the help they received and still needed. Using grounded theory methods 16 survivors from a broad socioeconomic base were interviewed. The data from these audiotaped interviews were analyzed using constant comparative methods. Three years later additional data were collected, analyzed, and compared to the previous data, which strengthened the findings. The Disaster Response Theory emerged from the data and was grounded in it. According to this theory, following Hurricane Mitch the survivors experienced the problem of powerlessness. Their response to powerlessness was the process of Moving Forward depicted by the Disaster Response Theory. Moving Forward was a unique process, which was promoted by awareness and resourcefulness. Moving Forward as well as awareness and resourcefulness were experienced on both personal and global levels. The Disaster Response Theory is helpful for nurses and others providing assistance following a disaster. Greater recognition of the problem of powerlessness and the process of Moving Forward which is facilitated by awareness and resourcefulness can result in more effective relief efforts both immediately following and long after a disaster. Case studies involving survivors of the multiple hurricanes in Florida in 2004 will be used to demonstrate the relevance of this model.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Grounded Theory of Disaster Response of Honduran Survivorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155458-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Grounded Theory of Disaster Response of Honduran Survivors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Weiss, Jo Anne, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Florida Atlantic University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jweiss21@fau.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Following a disaster many people want to provide assistance to the survivors, however, they frequently do not know how to do this effectively. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the Disaster Response Theory, which was developed from a research project done in Honduras following Hurricane Mitch. The purpose of the grounded theory research was to generate a substantive theory that explained how Hondurans thought about their survival of Hurricane Mitch and the help they received and still needed. Using grounded theory methods 16 survivors from a broad socioeconomic base were interviewed. The data from these audiotaped interviews were analyzed using constant comparative methods. Three years later additional data were collected, analyzed, and compared to the previous data, which strengthened the findings. The Disaster Response Theory emerged from the data and was grounded in it. According to this theory, following Hurricane Mitch the survivors experienced the problem of powerlessness. Their response to powerlessness was the process of Moving Forward depicted by the Disaster Response Theory. Moving Forward was a unique process, which was promoted by awareness and resourcefulness. Moving Forward as well as awareness and resourcefulness were experienced on both personal and global levels. The Disaster Response Theory is helpful for nurses and others providing assistance following a disaster. Greater recognition of the problem of powerlessness and the process of Moving Forward which is facilitated by awareness and resourcefulness can result in more effective relief efforts both immediately following and long after a disaster. Case studies involving survivors of the multiple hurricanes in Florida in 2004 will be used to demonstrate the relevance of this model.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:51:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:51:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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