Caregivers of People With Alzheimer's Self-Reported Efficacy and Confidence Levels in Managing Resistive Behaviors During Bathing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155459
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caregivers of People With Alzheimer's Self-Reported Efficacy and Confidence Levels in Managing Resistive Behaviors During Bathing
Abstract:
Caregivers of People With Alzheimer's Self-Reported Efficacy and Confidence Levels in Managing Resistive Behaviors During Bathing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Kiley, Mary Elizabeth, RN, CDE
P.I. Institution Name:Boston College
Title:Caregivers of People with Alzheimer's Self-reported Efficacy and Confidence Levels in Managing Resistive Behaviors During Bathin
Co-Authors:Ellen Mahoney, RN, DNSc
Purpose: Resistiveness to care (RTC) commonly occurs in people with dementia during ADLs, particularly bathing. Family caregivers, however, often assume their pivotal role without training to manage RTC and may not feel efficacious, resulting in stress and inability to continue caring at home. The purpose of this study is to describe caregivers' perceptions of care recipient (CR) behaviors and their confidence and self-efficacy, and to examine the relationship between these variables to guide future research. Methods: Home visits were made by a nurse as part of a randomized controlled trial of interventions to improve RTC and caregiver self-efficacy with bathing. Caregivers recorded their experience in a semi-structured journal after performing a bath independently. Responses from the first journal from 27 caregivers were reviewed. Caregivers (age 67.7¦12.3) were primarily spouses (91%) and female (71%). Care recipients (age 76.5¦7.2) were 57% male with moderate/severe dementia (MMSE 7.2¦6.6). Results: Highest-frequency behaviors were saying no (55.6%), turning away (22.2%), pulling away (18.5%). While 42% of caregivers felt totally confident getting through the bath, fewer (32%)were confident responding to RTC or creating a pleasant experience(28%). Conversely, 25% expressed very low levels of confidence in these spheres. With self-efficacy, 47.6% perceived their efforts as very helpful while 1/3 reported low self-efficacy. Number of RTCs was negatively correlated with caregiver confidence (r -.51, p<.05) and self-efficacy (r -.48, p <.05). Caregiver confidence was positively correlated with perceived self-efficacy (r .58, p<.01). A striking qualitative finding was the frequency of comments relating negative bathing experiences to caregiver fatigue or ill-health. Conclusions and Implications: Findings support the need for efficacy interventions to assist caregivers in building confidence in conjunction with learning strategies to manage RTC. Data inform the need for coaching, the ôdoseö of interventions required, and provide insight into the reciprocal nature of caregiver-care recipient behavior
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaregivers of People With Alzheimer's Self-Reported Efficacy and Confidence Levels in Managing Resistive Behaviors During Bathingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155459-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Caregivers of People With Alzheimer's Self-Reported Efficacy and Confidence Levels in Managing Resistive Behaviors During Bathing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kiley, Mary Elizabeth, RN, CDE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Boston College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Caregivers of People with Alzheimer's Self-reported Efficacy and Confidence Levels in Managing Resistive Behaviors During Bathin</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mahoneeb@bc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ellen Mahoney, RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Resistiveness to care (RTC) commonly occurs in people with dementia during ADLs, particularly bathing. Family caregivers, however, often assume their pivotal role without training to manage RTC and may not feel efficacious, resulting in stress and inability to continue caring at home. The purpose of this study is to describe caregivers' perceptions of care recipient (CR) behaviors and their confidence and self-efficacy, and to examine the relationship between these variables to guide future research. Methods: Home visits were made by a nurse as part of a randomized controlled trial of interventions to improve RTC and caregiver self-efficacy with bathing. Caregivers recorded their experience in a semi-structured journal after performing a bath independently. Responses from the first journal from 27 caregivers were reviewed. Caregivers (age 67.7&brvbar;12.3) were primarily spouses (91%) and female (71%). Care recipients (age 76.5&brvbar;7.2) were 57% male with moderate/severe dementia (MMSE 7.2&brvbar;6.6). Results: Highest-frequency behaviors were saying no (55.6%), turning away (22.2%), pulling away (18.5%). While 42% of caregivers felt totally confident getting through the bath, fewer (32%)were confident responding to RTC or creating a pleasant experience(28%). Conversely, 25% expressed very low levels of confidence in these spheres. With self-efficacy, 47.6% perceived their efforts as very helpful while 1/3 reported low self-efficacy. Number of RTCs was negatively correlated with caregiver confidence (r -.51, p&lt;.05) and self-efficacy (r -.48, p &lt;.05). Caregiver confidence was positively correlated with perceived self-efficacy (r .58, p&lt;.01). A striking qualitative finding was the frequency of comments relating negative bathing experiences to caregiver fatigue or ill-health. Conclusions and Implications: Findings support the need for efficacy interventions to assist caregivers in building confidence in conjunction with learning strategies to manage RTC. Data inform the need for coaching, the &ocirc;dose&ouml; of interventions required, and provide insight into the reciprocal nature of caregiver-care recipient behavior</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:51:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:51:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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