2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155460
Type:
Presentation
Title:
HIV Risk, Violence, and Depression in Incarcerated Latino Youth
Abstract:
HIV Risk, Violence, and Depression in Incarcerated Latino Youth
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Lesser, Janna, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Manuel Oscos-Sanchez, MD
The purpose of this formative study is to contribute to health disparities research by addressing the interrelated health problems of HIV risk, violence, and depression among incarcerated Latino male youth in South Texas. For these youth, risk for HIV infection is exacerbated by poverty, belonging to an ethnic group disproportionately affected by HIV, high rates of sexually-transmitted infections (STIs), and exposure to domestic and community violence. High levels of violence and aggression, as well as gang associations, both within the community and the home characterize the environment in which many detained Latino youth have been raised. Accumulating evidence links history of childhood abuse and exposure to both domestic and community violence with both depression and with risk for HIV. In this study, the perceptions of disenfranchised and vulnerable young males residing in juvenile detention about their risk for HIV and other sexually-transmitted infections (STIs), exposure to violence, and their risk for depression are being explored. Twenty young males will be participating in one of a series of focus groups. Ten young men will also be asked to take part in an individual follow-up interview. Findings from this pilot will be used to modify an existing HIV prevention curriculum ôRespeto/Proteger: Respecting and Protecting Our Relationshipsö for the target population as well as enhance the intervention with violence prevention strategies. While this innovative, culturally-based and theory driven intervention was developed for and with Latino youth, more data are needed to adapt the curriculum specifically for the target population, incarcerated Latino youth, whose specific risk perceptions and behaviors may be different from those of community dwelling youth. The qualitative data will inform the intervention development by speaking to the values held by the target population and including content and strategies that make sense to them in the context of their daily lives.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHIV Risk, Violence, and Depression in Incarcerated Latino Youthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155460-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">HIV Risk, Violence, and Depression in Incarcerated Latino Youth</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lesser, Janna, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lesser@uthscsa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Manuel Oscos-Sanchez, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this formative study is to contribute to health disparities research by addressing the interrelated health problems of HIV risk, violence, and depression among incarcerated Latino male youth in South Texas. For these youth, risk for HIV infection is exacerbated by poverty, belonging to an ethnic group disproportionately affected by HIV, high rates of sexually-transmitted infections (STIs), and exposure to domestic and community violence. High levels of violence and aggression, as well as gang associations, both within the community and the home characterize the environment in which many detained Latino youth have been raised. Accumulating evidence links history of childhood abuse and exposure to both domestic and community violence with both depression and with risk for HIV. In this study, the perceptions of disenfranchised and vulnerable young males residing in juvenile detention about their risk for HIV and other sexually-transmitted infections (STIs), exposure to violence, and their risk for depression are being explored. Twenty young males will be participating in one of a series of focus groups. Ten young men will also be asked to take part in an individual follow-up interview. Findings from this pilot will be used to modify an existing HIV prevention curriculum &ocirc;Respeto/Proteger: Respecting and Protecting Our Relationships&ouml; for the target population as well as enhance the intervention with violence prevention strategies. While this innovative, culturally-based and theory driven intervention was developed for and with Latino youth, more data are needed to adapt the curriculum specifically for the target population, incarcerated Latino youth, whose specific risk perceptions and behaviors may be different from those of community dwelling youth. The qualitative data will inform the intervention development by speaking to the values held by the target population and including content and strategies that make sense to them in the context of their daily lives.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:51:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:51:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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