2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155468
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Americanization of Nightingales: British Immigrant Nurses, 1870-1930
Abstract:
The Americanization of Nightingales: British Immigrant Nurses, 1870-1930
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Egenes, Karen J., RN, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago
Title:Associate Professor
During the nineteenth century, Philadelphia became a leading medical center in the United States. Hospital boards sought to elevate the status of their institutions through linkages to the Nightingale model, and eagerly recruited British lady nurses to administer Philadelphia hospitals and training schools. In England, upper class protTgTes of Florence Nightingale had established respectability for nursing through their assertion that their elevated social status and moral superiority could transform the corrupt environment of the hospital. However, in England, unbeknownst to the American hospital trustees, lady nurses were often appointed as superintendents because of their social status rather than their skill in nursing or their aptitude for administration. Alice Fisher was one of the first British nurse superintendents to be recruited. Her legendary success in the reform of the Philadelphia Almshouse, and resultant premature death, further fueled the drive to recruit British nurses. Upon their arrival in the United States, many of the British nurses found the culture to be alien and hostile. The British tradition of privilege based on social status was often unacceptable in egalitarian environment of nineteenth century America. Many British nurses were ill prepared for the hard work expected of them by physicians and hospital trustees. In addition, many Philadelphia natives harbored anti-British sentiments stemming from Revolutionary War battles that were fought only a century before. It remained for the second generation of British immigrant nurses, the students and colleagues of first nurses recruited to Philadelphia, to leave a lasting mark on American nursing. The gradual process of their Americanization and adaptation to the dominant culture, rendered them able to make significant and lasting contribute to American nursing in ways that were embraced by American colleagues. Lessons from the recruitment and socialization of nineteenth century British nurses can inform current attempts to recruit nurses from abroad.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Americanization of Nightingales: British Immigrant Nurses, 1870-1930en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155468-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Americanization of Nightingales: British Immigrant Nurses, 1870-1930</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Egenes, Karen J., RN, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kegenes@luc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">During the nineteenth century, Philadelphia became a leading medical center in the United States. Hospital boards sought to elevate the status of their institutions through linkages to the Nightingale model, and eagerly recruited British lady nurses to administer Philadelphia hospitals and training schools. In England, upper class protTgTes of Florence Nightingale had established respectability for nursing through their assertion that their elevated social status and moral superiority could transform the corrupt environment of the hospital. However, in England, unbeknownst to the American hospital trustees, lady nurses were often appointed as superintendents because of their social status rather than their skill in nursing or their aptitude for administration. Alice Fisher was one of the first British nurse superintendents to be recruited. Her legendary success in the reform of the Philadelphia Almshouse, and resultant premature death, further fueled the drive to recruit British nurses. Upon their arrival in the United States, many of the British nurses found the culture to be alien and hostile. The British tradition of privilege based on social status was often unacceptable in egalitarian environment of nineteenth century America. Many British nurses were ill prepared for the hard work expected of them by physicians and hospital trustees. In addition, many Philadelphia natives harbored anti-British sentiments stemming from Revolutionary War battles that were fought only a century before. It remained for the second generation of British immigrant nurses, the students and colleagues of first nurses recruited to Philadelphia, to leave a lasting mark on American nursing. The gradual process of their Americanization and adaptation to the dominant culture, rendered them able to make significant and lasting contribute to American nursing in ways that were embraced by American colleagues. Lessons from the recruitment and socialization of nineteenth century British nurses can inform current attempts to recruit nurses from abroad.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:52:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:52:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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