The Effect of Buddhist Mindfulness Meditation on Conservative Versus Liberal Religious Beliefs and Secretory Immunoglobulin A in Saliva in Tension Headache Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155499
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Buddhist Mindfulness Meditation on Conservative Versus Liberal Religious Beliefs and Secretory Immunoglobulin A in Saliva in Tension Headache Patients
Abstract:
The Effect of Buddhist Mindfulness Meditation on Conservative Versus Liberal Religious Beliefs and Secretory Immunoglobulin A in Saliva in Tension Headache Patients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Rosdahl, Dana R., PhD, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
This research study sought to answer if one's religious belief can influence the effect of a Buddhist mind-body intervention in a specific patient population. Individuals with tension headaches were categorized according to religious belief, Christian (conservative vs. liberal), Non-Christian and Other. Two research questions were examined: (1) Is there differences in spiritual practices and religious belief over time between the intervention and comparison groups and (2) Is there differences in salivary immunoglobulin A (sIgA) and religious belief over time between groups? A mixed pre-/post-experimental design with pre-/post-longitudinal measurements was used to examine this question. The sample consisted of 50 women and 14 men with tension headaches, aged 18û70; 34 were randomly assigned to an intervention group and 30 to a comparison group. Intervention participants received an 8-week Buddhist mindfulness meditation class, 2 hours a week. Comparison participants received an 8-week educational class in headaches, 1+ hours a week. Pre- and post-testing measurements were obtained on spiritual practices and sIgA. Analysis results, using univariate repeated measures ANOVAs indicated (1) a statistically significant mean difference for spiritual practices by religious belief at post-test and (2) a statistically significant mean difference for the dependent variable of sIgA by religious belief at post-test with the intervention group to have a higher post-treatment sIgA level than the comparison group. Within the intervention group the liberal Christians and non-Christians had a greater increase in sIgA than conservative Christians. Conservative Christians were unable to experience the immune enhancing effect of a Buddhist mindfulness intervention. This research study validated the necessity of spiritual congruence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Buddhist Mindfulness Meditation on Conservative Versus Liberal Religious Beliefs and Secretory Immunoglobulin A in Saliva in Tension Headache Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155499-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Buddhist Mindfulness Meditation on Conservative Versus Liberal Religious Beliefs and Secretory Immunoglobulin A in Saliva in Tension Headache Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rosdahl, Dana R., PhD, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">drosdahl@asu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This research study sought to answer if one's religious belief can influence the effect of a Buddhist mind-body intervention in a specific patient population. Individuals with tension headaches were categorized according to religious belief, Christian (conservative vs. liberal), Non-Christian and Other. Two research questions were examined: (1) Is there differences in spiritual practices and religious belief over time between the intervention and comparison groups and (2) Is there differences in salivary immunoglobulin A (sIgA) and religious belief over time between groups? A mixed pre-/post-experimental design with pre-/post-longitudinal measurements was used to examine this question. The sample consisted of 50 women and 14 men with tension headaches, aged 18&ucirc;70; 34 were randomly assigned to an intervention group and 30 to a comparison group. Intervention participants received an 8-week Buddhist mindfulness meditation class, 2 hours a week. Comparison participants received an 8-week educational class in headaches, 1+ hours a week. Pre- and post-testing measurements were obtained on spiritual practices and sIgA. Analysis results, using univariate repeated measures ANOVAs indicated (1) a statistically significant mean difference for spiritual practices by religious belief at post-test and (2) a statistically significant mean difference for the dependent variable of sIgA by religious belief at post-test with the intervention group to have a higher post-treatment sIgA level than the comparison group. Within the intervention group the liberal Christians and non-Christians had a greater increase in sIgA than conservative Christians. Conservative Christians were unable to experience the immune enhancing effect of a Buddhist mindfulness intervention. This research study validated the necessity of spiritual congruence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:53:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:53:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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