Effect of Eye Goggles and Earmuffs on the Physiological Stability and Pain Response of Preterm Neonates

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155502
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Eye Goggles and Earmuffs on the Physiological Stability and Pain Response of Preterm Neonates
Abstract:
Effect of Eye Goggles and Earmuffs on the Physiological Stability and Pain Response of Preterm Neonates
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Aita, Marilyn, MSc
P.I. Institution Name:McGill University
Title:Ph.D. student
Co-Authors:C. Celeste Johnston, RN, DEd
Environmental light and noise in the neonatal unit are identified as major sources of stimulation creating physiological instability in preterm neonates. Growing theoretical knowledge also reveals that non-painful sensory stimulations may affect pain response of neonates, further supporting the importance of limiting their exposure to light and noise in the neonatal unit. The objectives of this study are to: a) evaluate the physiological stability of 28 to 32 weeks post-conceptional age neonates wearing eye goggles and earmuffs for a 4-hr period; b) evaluate pain response of 28 to 32 weeks neonates during a heel lance following a 4-hr period wearing eye goggles and earmuffs. A prospective crossover experimental design where neonates serve as their own control group is use to evaluate the effect of the intervention. The neonates are randomly assigned to the group sequences and a period around 20 hrs is allocated between the sequences to allow a wash-out of the intervention. Data are collected in 3 university-affiliated hospitals in Montreal. A convenient sample of 80 preterm neonates is targeted and until now 38 have been participating in the study. The physiological stability is measured by the variation of heart rate, oxygen saturation, and vagal tone over the study sequences. The SNAP and NTISS are also used to obtain a physiological severity score. The pain response is measured by the variation of mean heart rate, oxygen saturation, and vagal tone over the heel lancing procedure. The findings will follow the completion of data collection in progress. Results should be available at the time of the conference. The intervention effect will be analyzed using MANCOVA. This research contributes to the body of knowledge in neonatal care by evaluating an innovative intervention that can be performed by neonatal nurses and that has the objective of reducing the stress and pain response in preterm neonates.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Eye Goggles and Earmuffs on the Physiological Stability and Pain Response of Preterm Neonatesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155502-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Eye Goggles and Earmuffs on the Physiological Stability and Pain Response of Preterm Neonates</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Aita, Marilyn, MSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">McGill University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Ph.D. student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">marilyn.aitt@videotron.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Celeste Johnston, RN, DEd</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Environmental light and noise in the neonatal unit are identified as major sources of stimulation creating physiological instability in preterm neonates. Growing theoretical knowledge also reveals that non-painful sensory stimulations may affect pain response of neonates, further supporting the importance of limiting their exposure to light and noise in the neonatal unit. The objectives of this study are to:&nbsp;a) evaluate the physiological stability of 28 to 32 weeks post-conceptional age neonates wearing eye goggles and earmuffs for a 4-hr period; b) evaluate pain response of 28 to 32 weeks neonates during a&nbsp;heel lance following a 4-hr period wearing eye goggles and earmuffs. A prospective crossover experimental design where&nbsp;neonates serve as their own control group is use to evaluate the effect of the intervention. The neonates are randomly assigned to the group sequences and a period around 20 hrs is allocated between the sequences to allow a wash-out of the intervention. Data are collected in 3 university-affiliated hospitals in Montreal. A convenient sample of 80 preterm neonates is targeted and until now 38 have been participating in the study. The physiological stability is measured by the variation of heart rate, oxygen saturation, and vagal tone over the study sequences. The SNAP and NTISS are also used to obtain a physiological severity score. The pain response is measured by the variation of mean heart rate, oxygen saturation, and vagal tone over the heel lancing procedure. The findings will follow the completion of data collection in progress. Results should be available at the time of the conference. The intervention effect will be analyzed using MANCOVA. This research contributes to the body of knowledge in neonatal care by evaluating an innovative intervention that can be performed by neonatal nurses and that has the objective of reducing the stress and pain response in preterm neonates.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:54:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:54:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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