Feasibility of Culturally Competent Diabetes Education to Reduce Emergency Department Visits for African Americans with Diabetes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155504
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Feasibility of Culturally Competent Diabetes Education to Reduce Emergency Department Visits for African Americans with Diabetes
Abstract:
Feasibility of Culturally Competent Diabetes Education to Reduce Emergency Department Visits for African Americans with Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Anderson-Loftin, Wanda, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of South Carolina
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective:  African Americans with diabetes have greater health disparities frequently resulting in greater Emergency Department (ED) utilization and hospitalizations. Community-based diabetes self-management interventions, tailored to the African American culture, can reduce resource utilization by improving glycemic control, preventable complications, and management of multiple chronic illnesses. This study was to determine the feasibility of a culturally competent diabetes self-management intervention aimed at reducing ED visits and hospitalizations. Specific aims were: (a) evaluate effects of intervention on outcomes; (b) assess adherence; (c) assess recruitment and retention.  Design:Longitudinal, experimental study.Population, Sample, Setting, Years97 high-risk, African-Americans with type 2 diabetes were recruited from a rural South Carolina county. Study dates were 2001 to 2003.Intervention and Outcome Variables:The intervention was dietary self-management education. Outcomes were ED visits and hospitalizationsMethods:Participants were randomly assigned to usual care, referral to traditional diabetes education, or intervention, consisting of four, 1 ½  hour classes in practical low-fat dietary strategies, 5 monthly peer-professional group discussions, and weekly telephone follow-up by a nurse case manager.  The intervention was culturally competent in terms of ethnic beliefs, values, customs, food preferences, language, and learning methods. Data were collected by self-reported questionnaires and interview.Findings:A non-significant trend in reduction of ED visits was observed for a net difference of 4 visits between groups. Hospitalizations increased for the experimental group and were unchanged for the control group. Participation was 84%; retention was 78% for the experimental group versus 56% for usual care; overall retention was 67%. Mean attendance was 4.8 (SD 2.6) of 8 intervention sessions. Conclusions:Culturally competent dietary self-management attracts large percentages of high-risk participants and may reduce ED visits, especially repeated visits, for rural, southern African-Americans. A larger experimental study is needed that offers a more attractive option to the control group than simply referral.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFeasibility of Culturally Competent Diabetes Education to Reduce Emergency Department Visits for African Americans with Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155504-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Feasibility of Culturally Competent Diabetes Education to Reduce Emergency Department Visits for African Americans with Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anderson-Loftin, Wanda, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of South Carolina</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wanda.anderson-loftin@sc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective:&nbsp; African Americans with diabetes have greater health disparities frequently resulting in greater Emergency Department (ED) utilization and hospitalizations. Community-based diabetes self-management interventions, tailored to the African American culture, can reduce resource utilization by improving glycemic control, preventable complications, and management of multiple chronic illnesses. This study was to determine the feasibility of a culturally competent diabetes self-management intervention aimed at reducing ED visits and hospitalizations. Specific aims were: (a) evaluate effects of intervention on outcomes; (b) assess adherence; (c) assess recruitment and retention.&nbsp; Design:Longitudinal, experimental study.Population, Sample, Setting, Years97 high-risk, African-Americans with type 2 diabetes were recruited from a rural South Carolina county. Study dates were 2001 to 2003.Intervention and Outcome Variables:The intervention was dietary self-management education. Outcomes were ED visits and hospitalizationsMethods:Participants were randomly assigned to usual care, referral to traditional diabetes education, or intervention, consisting of four, 1 &frac12;&nbsp; hour classes in practical low-fat dietary strategies, 5 monthly peer-professional group discussions, and weekly telephone follow-up by a nurse case manager.&nbsp; The intervention was culturally competent in terms of ethnic beliefs, values, customs, food preferences, language, and learning methods. Data were collected by self-reported questionnaires and interview.Findings:A non-significant trend in reduction of ED visits was observed for a net difference of 4 visits between groups. Hospitalizations increased for the experimental group and were unchanged for the control group. Participation was 84%; retention was 78% for the experimental group versus 56% for usual care; overall retention was 67%. Mean attendance was 4.8 (SD 2.6) of 8 intervention sessions. Conclusions:Culturally competent dietary self-management attracts large percentages of high-risk participants and may reduce ED visits, especially repeated visits, for rural, southern African-Americans. A larger experimental study is needed that offers a more attractive option to the control group than simply referral.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:54:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:54:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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