Sensory Preparatory Training Promotes Self Management Skills in Heart Failure

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155508
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sensory Preparatory Training Promotes Self Management Skills in Heart Failure
Abstract:
Sensory Preparatory Training Promotes Self Management Skills in Heart Failure
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Baas, Linda, PhD, CS-ACNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:Professor
Self-management is a goal in the treatment of persons with heart failure (HF) but education alone is not successful. Leventhal theorized that teaching sensory along with factual information can decrease stress and improve outcomes. Johnson developed sensory preparatory training (SPT) for patients undergoing acute stressful procedures. The purpose of this pilot was to refine and evaluate a SPT program of self-management in a chronic setting with patients with symptomatic HF. The sample was married (41%), retired/disabled (65%), female (67%), Caucasian (65%) with some college (70.6%), and age 59 (sd ± 11) years. Two groups completed the SPT program; one group attended 4 weekly meetings (n=4), the other 6 (n=13). Each 2-hour class included information on HF or treatments along with body awareness exercises. Subjects kept logs of symptoms and weight, and completed surveys pre, post and at 2 month follow-up of the SPT. Self-management skills and self-efficacy as measured by the Self-Care HF Scale significantly (p<.05) improved after SPT with a slight drop off at 2 months. The stress visual analog scores significantly decreased post intervention with an increase at follow-up.  Monitoring style of coping was related to a lower level of stress post intervention (r= -.52). Self-efficacy and stress were inversely related at the 2 month follow up (r = -.635). Over the study, 5 subjects became asymptomatic despite the severe nature of the HF while only 3 became more symptomatic. All subjects strongly agreed that they gained skill in body awareness, early symptom recognition, and self-care. Conclusion: While self-efficacy and self-care actions increased with the SPT intervention these effects did decline at follow up. This may be due to fading of the intervention over time, the absence of group support, and/or the increased perception of stress. This study supports the need for a larger trial.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSensory Preparatory Training Promotes Self Management Skills in Heart Failureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155508-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sensory Preparatory Training Promotes Self Management Skills in Heart Failure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baas, Linda, PhD, CS-ACNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">linda.baas@uc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Self-management is a goal in the treatment of persons with heart failure (HF) but education alone is not successful. Leventhal theorized that teaching sensory along with factual information can decrease stress and improve outcomes. Johnson developed sensory preparatory training (SPT) for patients undergoing acute stressful procedures. The purpose of this pilot was to refine and evaluate a SPT program of self-management in a chronic setting with patients with symptomatic HF. The sample was married (41%), retired/disabled (65%), female (67%), Caucasian (65%) with some college (70.6%), and age 59 (sd &plusmn; 11) years. Two groups completed the SPT program; one group attended 4 weekly meetings (n=4), the other 6 (n=13). Each 2-hour class included information on HF or treatments along with body awareness exercises. Subjects kept logs of symptoms and weight, and completed surveys pre, post and at 2 month follow-up of the SPT. Self-management skills and self-efficacy as measured by the Self-Care HF Scale significantly (p&lt;.05) improved after SPT with a slight drop off at 2 months. The stress visual analog scores significantly decreased post intervention with an increase at follow-up.&nbsp; Monitoring style of coping was related to a lower level of stress post intervention (r= -.52). Self-efficacy and stress were inversely related at the 2 month follow up (r = -.635). Over the study, 5 subjects became asymptomatic despite the severe nature of the HF while only 3 became more symptomatic. All subjects strongly agreed that they gained skill in body awareness, early symptom recognition, and self-care. Conclusion: While self-efficacy and self-care actions increased with the SPT intervention these effects did decline at follow up. This may be due to fading of the intervention over time, the absence of group support, and/or the increased perception of stress. This study supports the need for a larger trial.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:54:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:54:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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