2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155510
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Infant Feeding: Conflicts in Family and Healthcare Provider Advice
Abstract:
Infant Feeding: Conflicts in Family and Healthcare Provider Advice
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Barton, Sharon, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kentucky
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Judi Daniels, ARNP, PhD
Purpose:  The purpose of this study was to describe family and healthcare provider advice regarding infant feeding. Method:  This study was part of a larger longitudinal ethnography investigating family and cultural influences on infant feeding practices.  Interviews with mothers and family members at data collection points of 1-2 months, 4-6 months, and 10-12 months, followed WHO and AAP recommendations for the progression of infant feeding from formula or breastmilk, to addition of solid foods, to self-feeding foods, finally to weaning from the breast or bottle.  As part of the ethnography, interviews were conducted with physicians, nurse practitioners, workers with the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) food supplement program, and community workers promoting healthy infant feeding and parenting.  Interviews were recorded and transcribed, field notes described communities. Findings:  Family members recommended feeding infants cereal in the bottle to lengthen sleep.  Some health providers actually supported this recommendation while others disagreed with the practice but did not provide advice to parents.  Some physicians believed that infants were being overfed but were reluctant to provide advice because they did not want to lose the family?s ?trust?.  Fast food was a common component of the infant diet during the last half of the first year of life.  Families did not recognize that the content of infant meals was important to later growth and development.   Discussion:  Local customs in the study area included early introduction of solid foods and rapid advancement to table foods.  Families clashed with health providers regarding infant feeding advice particularly on using solid food to promote nighttime sleep and recognizing developmental readiness for solid foods.  Understanding and responding to local cultural norms and family beliefs can help nurses tailor health promotion to improve infant feeding practices.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInfant Feeding: Conflicts in Family and Healthcare Provider Adviceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155510-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Infant Feeding: Conflicts in Family and Healthcare Provider Advice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Barton, Sharon, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kentucky</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sharon.barton@uky.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judi Daniels, ARNP, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose:&nbsp; The purpose of this study was to describe family and healthcare provider advice regarding infant feeding. Method:&nbsp; This study was part of a larger longitudinal ethnography investigating family and cultural influences on infant feeding practices.&nbsp; Interviews&nbsp;with mothers and family members at data collection points of 1-2 months, 4-6 months, and 10-12 months, followed WHO and AAP recommendations for the progression of infant feeding from formula or breastmilk, to addition of solid foods, to self-feeding foods, finally to weaning from the breast or bottle.&nbsp; As part of the ethnography, interviews were conducted with physicians, nurse practitioners, workers with the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) food supplement program, and community workers promoting healthy infant feeding and parenting.&nbsp; Interviews were recorded and transcribed, field notes described communities. Findings:&nbsp; Family members recommended feeding infants cereal in the bottle to lengthen sleep.&nbsp; Some health providers actually supported this recommendation while others disagreed with the practice but did not provide advice to parents.&nbsp; Some physicians believed that infants were being overfed but were reluctant to provide advice because they did not want to lose the family?s ?trust?.&nbsp; Fast food was a common component of the infant diet during the last half of the first year of life.&nbsp; Families did not recognize&nbsp;that the content of infant meals was important to later growth and development.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Discussion:&nbsp; Local customs in the study area included early introduction of solid foods and rapid advancement to table foods.&nbsp; Families clashed with health providers regarding infant feeding advice particularly on using solid food to promote nighttime sleep and recognizing developmental readiness for solid foods.&nbsp; Understanding and responding&nbsp;to&nbsp;local cultural norms and family beliefs can help nurses tailor health promotion to improve infant feeding practices.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:54:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:54:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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