2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155538
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Perceived Therapeutic Efficacy Scale
Abstract:
The Perceived Therapeutic Efficacy Scale
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pittsburgh
Co-Authors:Lora Burke, PhD, RN; Elizabeth A. Schlenk, PhD, RN; Susan Sereika, PhD
Expectancies have been found to play a role in both clinical outcomes and, through studies using the self-efficacy model, in patient behaviors. The self-efficacy model includes both self-efficacy, the expectation that one will engage in a behavior, and outcome expectancy, the expectation that the behavior will have a desired outcome. However, most of the work has focused on self-efficacy. With the design of the perceived therapeutic efficacy scale (PTES), the CRCD has begun work on the role of outcome expectations in patient behavior, particularly related to adherence to treatment regimens. The original instrument was designed as a 10 item inventory that seeks a rating of the patient's expectation that various regimen related behaviors will influence the targeted clinical outcome, and was designed to examine medication taking behaviors. It was subsequently modified to examine dietary behaviors and exercise behaviors. Psychometric evaluation of each 10-item form was undertaken. An examination of the medication taking form of the PTES indicated that it was internally consistent (alpha = >.90), moderately stable over three weeks (r=.81) and six months (r=.61) and was associated with self-reported dosage adjustment and missed doses but not electronically measured adherence. The dietary and exercise versions of the PTES were also internally consistent (alpha = .83 to .94) and stable over three to sixteen weeks ( r=.7 to .9). Prediction of dietary and exercise behavior varied with the population and the behavior assessed, but the scales were better able to predict when sample sizes exceeded 30 (r=.32 to .55). The instrument appears useful in examining the patient's expectations about the relationship between their behavior and expected clinical impact.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Perceived Therapeutic Efficacy Scaleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155538-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Perceived Therapeutic Efficacy Scale</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pittsburgh</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dunbar@pitt.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lora Burke, PhD, RN; Elizabeth A. Schlenk, PhD, RN; Susan Sereika, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Expectancies have been found to play a role in both clinical outcomes and, through studies using the self-efficacy model, in patient behaviors. The self-efficacy model includes both self-efficacy, the expectation that one will engage in a behavior, and outcome expectancy, the expectation that the behavior will have a desired outcome. However, most of the work has focused on self-efficacy. With the design of the perceived therapeutic efficacy scale (PTES), the CRCD has begun work on the role of outcome expectations in patient behavior, particularly related to adherence to treatment regimens. The original instrument was designed as a 10 item inventory that seeks a rating of the patient's expectation that various regimen related behaviors will influence the targeted clinical outcome, and was designed to examine medication taking behaviors. It was subsequently modified to examine dietary behaviors and exercise behaviors. Psychometric evaluation of each 10-item form was undertaken. An examination of the medication taking form of the PTES indicated that it was internally consistent (alpha = &gt;.90), moderately stable over three weeks (r=.81) and six months (r=.61) and was associated with self-reported dosage adjustment and missed doses but not electronically measured adherence. The dietary and exercise versions of the PTES were also internally consistent (alpha = .83 to .94) and stable over three to sixteen weeks ( r=.7 to .9). Prediction of dietary and exercise behavior varied with the population and the behavior assessed, but the scales were better able to predict when sample sizes exceeded 30 (r=.32 to .55). The instrument appears useful in examining the patient's expectations about the relationship between their behavior and expected clinical impact.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:56:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:56:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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