2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155544
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ensuring Quality of Life in Residential Aged Care
Abstract:
Ensuring Quality of Life in Residential Aged Care
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Edwards, Helen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Mary Courtney, PhD
Purpose:  to investigate quality of life (QoL) experienced by residents of aged care facilities.  Care facilities are homes as much as nursing facilities, with increasing Government and consumer pressure for quality outcomes in residential care facilities, assessing care practices is needed to determine QoL issues.  Method:  Residents were surveyed using the WHOQOL-100, which calculates a general QoL score, as well as 6 domain scores (Physical Health, Psychological Health, Level of Independence, Social Relationships, Environment, Spirituality).  A random sample of 76 facilities, stratified by size and location, was chosen from the national database of a major Australian aged care provider.  Each facility was sent five surveys for random distribution to residents; 189 surveys from 39 facilities were returned, constituting a 51% response rate.  Results:  When compared with a general community sample, the aged care facility residents recorded significantly better QoL scores in the domains of psychological health and environment, and significantly poorer QoL scores in level of independence.  Comparisons were made between sample subgroups, which revealed a number of differences.  The spiritual domain was most able to discriminate, with higher scores most likely from female residents, living in private rooms, within small facilities.  Overall QoL also discriminated between a number of resident groups, with higher scores most likely from female, low care residents in private rooms.  Conclusions:  High care residents and male residents appeared to require attention, thus it might benefit facilities to review the needs of those two groups.  Large facilities, in particular, might need to ensure residents are receiving sufficient individual attention and being engaged in meaningful activity.  Where possible, privacy should be maximised, with particular attention paid to privacy issues when residents must share facilities.  Further research with a larger, more comprehensive sample would benefit the emerging knowledge base on QoL in residential care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnsuring Quality of Life in Residential Aged Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155544-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Ensuring Quality of Life in Residential Aged Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Edwards, Helen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">h.edwards@qut.edu.au</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Courtney, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose:&nbsp;&nbsp;to investigate quality of life (QoL) experienced by residents of aged care facilities.&nbsp; Care facilities are homes as much as nursing facilities,&nbsp;with increasing Government and consumer pressure for quality outcomes in residential care facilities,&nbsp;assessing care practices is needed to determine&nbsp;QoL issues.&nbsp; Method:&nbsp; Residents were surveyed using the WHOQOL-100, which calculates a general QoL score, as well as 6 domain scores (Physical Health, Psychological Health, Level of Independence, Social Relationships, Environment, Spirituality).&nbsp; A random sample of 76 facilities, stratified by size and location, was chosen from the national database of a major Australian aged care provider.&nbsp; Each facility was sent five surveys for random distribution to residents; 189 surveys from 39 facilities were returned, constituting a 51% response rate.&nbsp; Results:&nbsp; When compared with a general community sample, the aged care facility residents recorded significantly better QoL scores in the domains of psychological health and environment, and significantly poorer QoL scores in level of independence.&nbsp; Comparisons were made between sample subgroups, which revealed a number of differences.&nbsp; The spiritual domain was most able to discriminate, with higher scores most likely from female residents, living in private rooms, within small facilities.&nbsp; Overall QoL also discriminated between a number of resident groups, with higher scores most likely from female, low care residents in private rooms.&nbsp; Conclusions:&nbsp; High care residents and male residents appeared to require attention, thus it might benefit facilities to review the needs of those two groups.&nbsp; Large facilities, in particular, might need to ensure residents are receiving sufficient individual attention and being engaged in meaningful activity.&nbsp; Where possible, privacy should be maximised, with particular attention paid to privacy issues when residents must share facilities.&nbsp; Further research with a larger, more comprehensive sample would benefit the emerging knowledge base on QoL in residential care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:56:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:56:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.