The Lived Experience of New Graduate Baccalaureate-Prepared Registered Nurses Working in an Acute-Care Hospital Setting

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155556
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Lived Experience of New Graduate Baccalaureate-Prepared Registered Nurses Working in an Acute-Care Hospital Setting
Abstract:
The Lived Experience of New Graduate Baccalaureate-Prepared Registered Nurses Working in an Acute-Care Hospital Setting
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Harper, Jeannie R., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Southeastern Louisiana University
Title:Instructor
This study explored the lived experience of new graduate baccalaureate-prepared Registered Nurses (RNs) who work in an acute care hospital setting. The study was a phenomenological qualitative research design, with researcher-developed guiding questions. Participants had passed the National Council for Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN), and had been practicing from three months to one year. Eight RNs participated in the study, with seven usable interviews. Results found that new graduate RNs experience multiple stressors, including high nurse-to-patient ratios, short orientation periods, time management and prioritizing, and lack of time with their preceptors. In addition, the RNs expressed frustration with the inability to spend quality time with their patients. Although patient?s needs were met, they were rushed in providing care and were unable to serve as a patient advocate. Other stressors identified by the RNs were concerns about interacting with physicians, and constant apprehension that a patient?s condition would deteriorate and they would not recognize the change in a timely manner. In addition, concerns about lack of staff support were mentioned. The results of this study also indicated that the new RNs were very committed to patient care and overall enjoyed nursing. While they acknowledged the stressors, many were very surprised by the mental and physical demands of working in an acute care hospital setting. Preceptors were also of great value in the transition. The researcher identified the following themes that emerged: 1) The Honeymoon Phase, where the new RNs were excited, nervous, and anxious about beginning their job; 2) The Transition Phase, where reality of their roles began to set in, and multiple stressors were identified; and 3) The Divorce or Reconciliation Phase, where the new RN made the decision to stay or leave their job in the acute care hospital setting.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Lived Experience of New Graduate Baccalaureate-Prepared Registered Nurses Working in an Acute-Care Hospital Settingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155556-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Lived Experience of New Graduate Baccalaureate-Prepared Registered Nurses Working in an Acute-Care Hospital Setting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harper, Jeannie R., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southeastern Louisiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jharper@selu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study explored the lived experience of new graduate baccalaureate-prepared Registered Nurses (RNs) who work in an acute care hospital setting. The study was a phenomenological qualitative research design, with researcher-developed guiding questions. Participants had passed the National Council for Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN), and had been practicing from three months to one year. Eight RNs participated in the study, with seven usable interviews. Results found that new graduate RNs experience multiple stressors, including high nurse-to-patient ratios, short orientation periods, time management and prioritizing, and lack of time with their preceptors. In addition, the RNs expressed frustration with the inability to spend quality time with their patients. Although patient?s needs were met, they were rushed in providing care and were unable to serve as a patient advocate. Other stressors identified by the RNs were concerns about interacting with physicians, and constant apprehension that a patient?s condition would deteriorate and they would not recognize the change in a timely manner. In addition, concerns about lack of staff support were mentioned. The results of this study also indicated that the new RNs were very committed to patient care and overall enjoyed nursing. While they acknowledged the stressors, many were very surprised by the mental and physical demands of working in an acute care hospital setting. Preceptors were also of great value in the transition. The researcher identified the following themes that emerged: 1) The Honeymoon Phase, where the new RNs were excited, nervous, and anxious about beginning their job; 2) The Transition Phase, where reality of their roles began to set in, and multiple stressors were identified; and 3) The Divorce or Reconciliation Phase, where the new RN made the decision to stay or leave their job in the acute care hospital setting.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:57:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:57:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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