2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155580
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Chill Out! The Use of Therapeutic Hypothermia After Cardiac Arrest
Abstract:
Chill Out! The Use of Therapeutic Hypothermia After Cardiac Arrest
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Kupchik, Nicole L., RN, BSN, CCRN-CM
P.I. Institution Name:Harborview Medical Center/University of Washington
Title:Assistant Nurse Manager
Over 300,000 patients die each year from cardiac arrest.  With increased availability of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) and early defibrillation, many patients are successfully resuscitated, but many suffer permanent neurological damage.  Without oxygen, brain death can occur in four to six minutes.  Therapeutic hypothermia has been successfully instituted in many hospitals across the US, Europe and Australia.  The goal of therapeutic hypothermia is to halt chemical processes that occur after a hypoxic event and to preserve maximal brain function.  Patients are cooled to a temperature of 33 degrees C for 12 to 24 hours.  The American Heart Association recently endorsed the use of hypothermia after cardiac arrest.  This lecture is targeted at acute care RNs caring for patients after cardiac arrest and nurses that may be responsible for developing and implementing protocols for the use of therapeutic hypothermia.  Prerequisite knowledge includes the general care of patients after cardiac arrest.    Practical nursing implications will be discussed targeting the bedside practitioner.   A review of current literature will be discussed as well as outcomes from the protocol. A segment of the lecture or poster will focus on the physiologic effects of hypothermia.  This knowledge will educate the bedside nurse on the signs and symptoms to observe for safe patient care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChill Out! The Use of Therapeutic Hypothermia After Cardiac Arresten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155580-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Chill Out! The Use of Therapeutic Hypothermia After Cardiac Arrest</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kupchik, Nicole L., RN, BSN, CCRN-CM</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Harborview Medical Center/University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Nurse Manager</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nkupchik@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Over 300,000 patients die each year from cardiac arrest.&nbsp; With increased availability of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) and early defibrillation, many patients are successfully resuscitated, but many suffer permanent neurological damage.&nbsp; Without oxygen, brain death can occur in four to six minutes.&nbsp; Therapeutic hypothermia has been successfully instituted in many hospitals across the US, Europe and Australia.&nbsp; The goal of therapeutic hypothermia is to halt chemical processes that occur after a hypoxic event and to preserve maximal brain function.&nbsp; Patients are cooled to a temperature of 33 degrees C for 12 to 24 hours.&nbsp; The American Heart Association recently endorsed the use of hypothermia after cardiac arrest.&nbsp; This lecture is targeted at acute care RNs caring for patients after cardiac arrest and nurses that may be responsible for developing and implementing protocols for the use of therapeutic hypothermia.&nbsp; Prerequisite knowledge includes the general care of patients after cardiac arrest. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Practical nursing implications will be discussed targeting the bedside practitioner.&nbsp;&nbsp; A review of current literature will be discussed as well as outcomes from the protocol. A segment of the lecture or poster will focus on the physiologic effects of hypothermia.&nbsp; This knowledge will educate the bedside nurse on the signs and symptoms to observe for safe patient care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:58:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:58:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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