Impact of a Nurse-Managed, Community-Based Breast and Cervical Cancer Education and Screening Program on High-Risk Underserved Women in a Nicaraguan Barrio

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155590
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of a Nurse-Managed, Community-Based Breast and Cervical Cancer Education and Screening Program on High-Risk Underserved Women in a Nicaraguan Barrio
Abstract:
Impact of a Nurse-Managed, Community-Based Breast and Cervical Cancer Education and Screening Program on High-Risk Underserved Women in a Nicaraguan Barrio
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Lockhart, Joan Such, PhD, RN, CORLN, AOCN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Duquesne University School of Nursing
Title:Professor & Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Co-Authors:Leah Vota Cunningham, MNEd, RN; Carmen Benavides Mora, MSP; Teodora Gaitán Mercado, Mssr
Objectives: To determine the impact of a nurse-managed community-based breast and cervical cancer screening program on the knowledge level and perceived benefits of women in a Nicaraguan barrio and in diagnosing cancer early. Design: This pilot intervention study used a pretest-posttest within-subject, quasi-experimental design to compare outcomes prior to and six months following participation in a screening program. Population/Sample/Setting/Years: In 2002-2003, 320 high-risk underserved women living in a Nicaraguan barrio of nearly 10,000 residents were randomly selected to participate. Intervention/Outcome Variables: The screening program, developed by Nicaraguan nurses following an educational program sponsored by US nurses, was implemented through the barrio’s nurse-managed clinic. Women learned BSE, received breast and PAP/pelvic exams, and were case-managed through mammograms and follow-up treatments provided by collaborative Nicaraguan partners. Outcomes were measured through private interviews using the Spanish version of Barriers to Breast and Cervical Cancer, previously used in Nicaragua. Knowledge of breast and cervical cancer, benefits of screening, and cancer stage at diagnosis were tracked. Methods: Women were interviewed prior to and approximately six months following the screening program and offered follow-up treatment at no cost. Findings: All women completed the program. Posttest measures revealed positive outcomes. Five women had cervical cancer, two HPV, and 90% infections/STDs. Following study completion, one woman who sought treatment after hearing about the program, was diagnosed with breast cancer. Positive evaluation data were obtained through focus groups. Conclusions: This pilot program provides an alternative screening model that can assist Nicaraguan health officials in reducing cervical cancer morbidity/mortality. Its value in detecting breast cancer needs revisited. Implications: Creative community-based models for cancer screening are essential in reducing health disparities among vulnerable populations in developing countries like Nicaragua. Nurses assumed a leadership role in improving quality of life by minimizing the need for extensive, costly cancer treatment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of a Nurse-Managed, Community-Based Breast and Cervical Cancer Education and Screening Program on High-Risk Underserved Women in a Nicaraguan Barrioen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155590-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of a Nurse-Managed, Community-Based Breast and Cervical Cancer Education and Screening Program on High-Risk Underserved Women in a Nicaraguan Barrio</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lockhart, Joan Such, PhD, RN, CORLN, AOCN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Duquesne University School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor &amp; Associate Dean for Academic Affairs</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lockhart@duq.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Leah Vota Cunningham, MNEd, RN; Carmen Benavides Mora, MSP; Teodora Gait&aacute;n Mercado, Mssr</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: To determine the impact of a nurse-managed community-based breast and cervical cancer screening program on the knowledge level and perceived benefits of women in a Nicaraguan barrio and in diagnosing cancer early. Design: This pilot intervention study used a pretest-posttest within-subject, quasi-experimental design to compare outcomes prior to and six months following participation in a screening program. Population/Sample/Setting/Years: In 2002-2003, 320 high-risk underserved women living in a Nicaraguan barrio of nearly 10,000 residents were randomly selected to participate. Intervention/Outcome Variables: The screening program, developed by Nicaraguan nurses following an educational program sponsored by US nurses, was implemented through the barrio&rsquo;s nurse-managed clinic. Women learned BSE, received breast and PAP/pelvic exams, and were case-managed through mammograms and follow-up treatments provided by collaborative Nicaraguan partners. Outcomes were measured through private interviews using the Spanish version of Barriers to Breast and Cervical Cancer, previously used in Nicaragua. Knowledge of breast and cervical cancer, benefits of screening, and cancer stage at diagnosis were tracked. Methods: Women were interviewed prior to and approximately six months following the screening program and offered follow-up treatment at no cost. Findings: All women completed the program. Posttest measures revealed positive outcomes. Five women had cervical cancer, two HPV, and 90% infections/STDs. Following study completion, one woman who sought treatment after hearing about the program, was diagnosed with breast cancer. Positive evaluation data were obtained through focus groups. Conclusions: This pilot program provides an alternative screening model that can assist Nicaraguan health officials in reducing cervical cancer morbidity/mortality. Its value in detecting breast cancer needs revisited. Implications: Creative community-based models for cancer screening are essential in reducing health disparities among vulnerable populations in developing countries like Nicaragua. Nurses assumed a leadership role in improving quality of life by minimizing the need for extensive, costly cancer treatment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:59:04Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:59:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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