2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155596
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Nursing Workplaces
Abstract:
Improving Nursing Workplaces
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:McLennan, Marianne P., BScN, MEd
P.I. Institution Name:Vancouver Island Health Authority
Title:Quality Improvement Manager
Objective: To explore how nursing work settings shape issues and organizational policy making by describing how one priority issue, improving management, was understood. Design: A qualitative research design was used to explore key stakeholder perspectives so that social dynamics that interact to shape the management issue and proposed solutions could be illuminated. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The investigation was conducted in 2003, within one Canadian health care organization in order to ensure a common administrative context. Concept: Work as a setting, which contains environmental characteristics that influence nurses’ health and productivity as well as facilitates or blocks improvements, was explored. Methods: Interviews with the chief nurse and three kinds of stakeholder focus groups were conducted: nurses; nurse managers, and union representatives. Content analysis was used to define the management issue, potential improvements, and desired results. Findings: Participants agreed on aspects of the management problem and desired results, however, differed in suggested improvement strategies because of divergent views about root causes of the problem. Evidence of human agency suggested that people are active both in assessing and acting on the meaning that things have for them as individuals and as groups. Conclusions: Developing definitions of work issues within their unique setting supports policy formulations that resonate with local people and their situations. Explicit leadership expectations for managers that emphasize fundamental staff relationship building are needed to engage nurses in jointly owning their workplaces. Implications: Recognizing that nursing leadership is embedded in settings amid active people and changing circumstances challenges traditional action -result thinking and therefore, represents a fundamental shift in prevalent leadership practices with significant implications for education and research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Nursing Workplacesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155596-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Improving Nursing Workplaces</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McLennan, Marianne P., BScN, MEd</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Vancouver Island Health Authority</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Quality Improvement Manager</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">marianne.mclennan@cvihr.bc.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To explore how nursing work settings shape issues and organizational policy making by describing how one priority issue, improving management, was understood. Design: A qualitative research design was used to explore key stakeholder perspectives so that social dynamics that interact to shape the management issue and proposed solutions could be illuminated. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The investigation was conducted in 2003, within one Canadian health care organization in order to ensure a common administrative context. Concept: Work as a setting, which contains environmental characteristics that influence nurses&rsquo; health and productivity as well as facilitates or blocks improvements, was explored. Methods: Interviews with the chief nurse and three kinds of stakeholder focus groups were conducted: nurses; nurse managers, and union representatives. Content analysis was used to define the management issue, potential improvements, and desired results. Findings: Participants agreed on aspects of the management problem and desired results, however, differed in suggested improvement strategies because of divergent views about root causes of the problem. Evidence of human agency suggested that people are active both in assessing and acting on the meaning that things have for them as individuals and as groups. Conclusions: Developing definitions of work issues within their unique setting supports policy formulations that resonate with local people and their situations. Explicit leadership expectations for managers that emphasize fundamental staff relationship building are needed to engage nurses in jointly owning their workplaces. Implications: Recognizing that nursing leadership is embedded in settings amid active people and changing circumstances challenges traditional action -result thinking and therefore, represents a fundamental shift in prevalent leadership practices with significant implications for education and research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:59:24Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:59:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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