Function and Structure of Community Learning Disability Teams: The Central Role of Community Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155607
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Function and Structure of Community Learning Disability Teams: The Central Role of Community Nurses
Abstract:
Function and Structure of Community Learning Disability Teams: The Central Role of Community Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Slevin, Eamonn, DNSc, PGDip, PGDip, BSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Ulster
Title:Lecturer in Nursing
Objectives: Objectives were to identify: The structure and function of community learning disability teams (CLDT); Key roles of nurses within CLDTs; Design: A qualitative research design was utilised with data being content analysed, although some data was quantified. Population: 12 focus group interviews were undertaken during 2003 (n = 72 participants) with CLDTs in Northern Ireland. The teams provided a service for adults and children with learning disabilities. Concepts studied: CLDTs structure and function; Nurses roles. Methods: Two researchers facilitated the focus group interviews with each CLDT. Content analysis of the narratives was undertaken, and some data was quantified to obtain descriptive detail of a demographic nature. Findings: The teams were of various structure, unidisciplinary and multidisciplinary. Of the 72 participants most were nurses 27 (38%) followed by social workers, allied health care professionals and clinical psychologist. Teams indicated they functioned well in supporting clients and families in inclusive community living. Nurses functioned in the following roles; coordinating care, family support, providing specialist health care for people with complex health needs, and a limited number providing specialist support for people with challenging behaviours and/or additional mental health problems. However, a number of barriers to service provision were identified. Conclusions: CLDTs can facilitate inclusive community living for people with learning disabilities, and nurses play a key role within such teams. However, this research suggests there are still challenges facing community care. Implications: CLDTs appear effective but these teams do need strengthened in terms of human resources and staff with specialist skills. A number of barriers to service provision were identified. The most significant of these were: lack of respite, staff with specialist skills to work with people who have challenging behaviour or mental health problems and community based treatment and assessment facilities. These barriers need to be overcome.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFunction and Structure of Community Learning Disability Teams: The Central Role of Community Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155607-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Function and Structure of Community Learning Disability Teams: The Central Role of Community Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Slevin, Eamonn, DNSc, PGDip, PGDip, BSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Ulster</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Lecturer in Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">JE.Slevin@ulster.ac.uk</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: Objectives were to identify: The structure and function of community learning disability teams (CLDT); Key roles of nurses within CLDTs; Design: A qualitative research design was utilised with data being content analysed, although some data was quantified. Population: 12 focus group interviews were undertaken during 2003 (n = 72 participants) with CLDTs in Northern Ireland. The teams provided a service for adults and children with learning disabilities. Concepts studied: CLDTs structure and function; Nurses roles. Methods: Two researchers facilitated the focus group interviews with each CLDT. Content analysis of the narratives was undertaken, and some data was quantified to obtain descriptive detail of a demographic nature. Findings: The teams were of various structure, unidisciplinary and multidisciplinary. Of the 72 participants most were nurses 27 (38%) followed by social workers, allied health care professionals and clinical psychologist. Teams indicated they functioned well in supporting clients and families in inclusive community living. Nurses functioned in the following roles; coordinating care, family support, providing specialist health care for people with complex health needs, and a limited number providing specialist support for people with challenging behaviours and/or additional mental health problems. However, a number of barriers to service provision were identified. Conclusions: CLDTs can facilitate inclusive community living for people with learning disabilities, and nurses play a key role within such teams. However, this research suggests there are still challenges facing community care. Implications: CLDTs appear effective but these teams do need strengthened in terms of human resources and staff with specialist skills. A number of barriers to service provision were identified. The most significant of these were: lack of respite, staff with specialist skills to work with people who have challenging behaviour or mental health problems and community based treatment and assessment facilities. These barriers need to be overcome.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:00:00Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:00:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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