2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155608
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Attitudinal Challenges to Building a Nursing Research Community
Abstract:
Attitudinal Challenges to Building a Nursing Research Community
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Smirnoff, Meg, MS, MPH, RN, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:Mount Sinai Medical Center
Title:Research Nurse Practitioner
Co-Authors:Marjorie S. Ramirez, MA, EdM, RNC, CNA; Linda Koplimae, BS, RN; Hussein Tahan, RN, MS, DNSc; Michael Gibney, MS, RN, CNS; Mary Dee McEvoy, PhD, RN, AOCN
Objective: Within a diverse community of nurses, conduct a baseline assessment of nurses’ attitudes towards nursing research (NR), their perceptions of the institution as a research environment and personal involvement in research activities. Design: Descriptive study utilizing a 12-item demographic data sheet and fifty question, reliability-tested and validated survey (Young 1983, revised Chenitz 1985) that measures nurses’ attitudes and perceptions toward NR, the research environment and personal research involvement. Population, Sample, Setting, Year: Convenience sample of all registered nurses working at a large, urban academic hospital (The Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York) during three-month study period in 2000. Concept/ Variables: Attitudes towards NR. Methods: Following IRB approval and obtaining support from nursing leadership, the authors and Nurse Managers explained the study to staff on each nursing unit and distributed the surveys. Three weeks later the completed, anonymous surveys were collected. The authors coordinated data analysis. Findings: 470 nurses completed the survey. (28% of total) They are ethnically/culturally diverse, 75% aged 30-54 yrs, 80% with greater than 10 years nursing experience, 82% baccalaureate-education or higher. 87% think research should guide nursing practice, 82% believe research participation is valuable experience, 50% feel comfortable doing research, fewer than 30% have personal research experience. Institutional and personal factors are identified that correlate with these data. Conclusions: Although the nurses have a positive attitude towards research, it is discordant with actual involvement with research activities. Implications: Patient care benefits from evidence-based practice. The literature reports that NR utilization is impacted by nurses’ attitudes. Once identified, focused initiatives can be implemented to effect change in professional practice. This research suggests that positive attitudes and perceived support is not enough to increase involvement in NR; additional institutional infrastructure and educational supports are needed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAttitudinal Challenges to Building a Nursing Research Communityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155608-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Attitudinal Challenges to Building a Nursing Research Community</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smirnoff, Meg, MS, MPH, RN, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mount Sinai Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Margaret.Smirnoff@MountSinai.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marjorie S. Ramirez, MA, EdM, RNC, CNA; Linda Koplimae, BS, RN; Hussein Tahan, RN, MS, DNSc; Michael Gibney, MS, RN, CNS; Mary Dee McEvoy, PhD, RN, AOCN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Within a diverse community of nurses, conduct a baseline assessment of nurses&rsquo; attitudes towards nursing research (NR), their perceptions of the institution as a research environment and personal involvement in research activities. Design: Descriptive study utilizing a 12-item demographic data sheet and fifty question, reliability-tested and validated survey (Young 1983, revised Chenitz 1985) that measures nurses&rsquo; attitudes and perceptions toward NR, the research environment and personal research involvement. Population, Sample, Setting, Year: Convenience sample of all registered nurses working at a large, urban academic hospital (The Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York) during three-month study period in 2000. Concept/ Variables: Attitudes towards NR. Methods: Following IRB approval and obtaining support from nursing leadership, the authors and Nurse Managers explained the study to staff on each nursing unit and distributed the surveys. Three weeks later the completed, anonymous surveys were collected. The authors coordinated data analysis. Findings: 470 nurses completed the survey. (28% of total) They are ethnically/culturally diverse, 75% aged 30-54 yrs, 80% with greater than 10 years nursing experience, 82% baccalaureate-education or higher. 87% think research should guide nursing practice, 82% believe research participation is valuable experience, 50% feel comfortable doing research, fewer than 30% have personal research experience. Institutional and personal factors are identified that correlate with these data. Conclusions: Although the nurses have a positive attitude towards research, it is discordant with actual involvement with research activities. Implications: Patient care benefits from evidence-based practice. The literature reports that NR utilization is impacted by nurses&rsquo; attitudes. Once identified, focused initiatives can be implemented to effect change in professional practice. This research suggests that positive attitudes and perceived support is not enough to increase involvement in NR; additional institutional infrastructure and educational supports are needed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:00:04Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:00:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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