2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155611
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preterm Motor Performance: Cohort Comparison at Age 4
Abstract:
Preterm Motor Performance: Cohort Comparison at Age 4
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Sullivan, Mary C., PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Rhode Island
Title:associate professor
Co-Authors:Margaret M. McGrath, DNSc, FAAN
Although advances in neonatal intensive care have increased preterm infant survival rates in the decade of the 1980s-1990s, it is unclear if poor motor outcomes will change with the decade of advances in technology. Objective: To compare oral, fine, gross, total, general motor and visual motor integration at age 4 in two preterm cohorts grouped by perinatal morbidity and born 10 years apart. Design: This is a two cohort, quasi-experimental, longitudinal study. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Cohort 1 (N=152) was born between 1985-1989, Cohort 2 (N=155) was born between 1996-1999. Each had wide variation in birth weight and grouped as (1) preterm with medical morbidity (MPT); (2) preterm with neurological morbidity (NPT); and (3) full term (FT) comparison. Outcome Variables: Identical measures for both cohorts were general motor (MSCA motor subtest), fine motor, gross motor, oral motor, total motor (RMPI), and visual motor integration (Beery VMI). Methods: Factorial 2x3 ANOVA with cohort (Cohort 1, Cohort 2) and perinatal group (FT, MPT, NPT) were performed for the 6 motor outcome tests; birth weight was a covariate. Findings: Significant cohort effects were found for visual motor integration (Cohort 1 had higher scores than Cohort 2), oral, fine, and total motor (Cohort 2 had higher scores than Cohort 1). Perinatal group was significant for all motor outcomes. Two significant interactions were found. Conclusions: Perinatal morbidity predicts motor performance in two cohorts of prematurely born pre-school age children born a decade apart with birth weight controlled. Implications: It is essential we have a better understanding of the factors that place children at risk for sequelae, that we are better able to identify at-risk children for development, and that we understand the ways in which childrens’ development can be compromised in order to design appropriate interventions. Research supported by: NIH NINR NR03695; NICHD HD037627
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreterm Motor Performance: Cohort Comparison at Age 4en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155611-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Preterm Motor Performance: Cohort Comparison at Age 4</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sullivan, Mary C., PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Rhode Island</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">associate professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mcsullivan@uri.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Margaret M. McGrath, DNSc, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although advances in neonatal intensive care have increased preterm infant survival rates in the decade of the 1980s-1990s, it is unclear if poor motor outcomes will change with the decade of advances in technology. Objective: To compare oral, fine, gross, total, general motor and visual motor integration at age 4 in two preterm cohorts grouped by perinatal morbidity and born 10 years apart. Design: This is a two cohort, quasi-experimental, longitudinal study. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Cohort 1 (N=152) was born between 1985-1989, Cohort 2 (N=155) was born between 1996-1999. Each had wide variation in birth weight and grouped as (1) preterm with medical morbidity (MPT); (2) preterm with neurological morbidity (NPT); and (3) full term (FT) comparison. Outcome Variables: Identical measures for both cohorts were general motor (MSCA motor subtest), fine motor, gross motor, oral motor, total motor (RMPI), and visual motor integration (Beery VMI). Methods: Factorial 2x3 ANOVA with cohort (Cohort 1, Cohort 2) and perinatal group (FT, MPT, NPT) were performed for the 6 motor outcome tests; birth weight was a covariate. Findings: Significant cohort effects were found for visual motor integration (Cohort 1 had higher scores than Cohort 2), oral, fine, and total motor (Cohort 2 had higher scores than Cohort 1). Perinatal group was significant for all motor outcomes. Two significant interactions were found. Conclusions: Perinatal morbidity predicts motor performance in two cohorts of prematurely born pre-school age children born a decade apart with birth weight controlled. Implications: It is essential we have a better understanding of the factors that place children at risk for sequelae, that we are better able to identify at-risk children for development, and that we understand the ways in which childrens&rsquo; development can be compromised in order to design appropriate interventions. Research supported by: NIH NINR NR03695; NICHD HD037627</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:00:15Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:00:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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