2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155616
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Irish Catholic Sisters and Nursing in America, 1865-1925
Abstract:
Irish Catholic Sisters and Nursing in America, 1865-1925
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Wall, Barbra, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Purdue University
Title:Assistant Professor, Purdue University
Objective: To examine the nursing of Irish immigrant nuns in the United States in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and their distinct beliefs and cultural traditions that they brought with them from Ireland that proved extremely useful as they negotiated new boundaries in the expanding nursing field. Design: Historical argument, exposition, and narrative are used to highlight the thesis that Irish sisters created hospitals where a specific, socially beneficial type of nursing care could be provided. Method: Historical methodology has involved seeking and evaluating evidence in primary sources located in the sisters’ archives. Specifically, methods of social and cultural history are used. Population/Years: Irish immigrant sister-nurses in the United States will be the focus. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Ireland was a fertile field for gleaning recruits for hospitals in America. Findings: Irish sister-nurses were a significant presence in the labor force of American hospitals. Their strong sense of self, their optimism, and a rigorous Irish Catholicism that emphasized discipline, obedience, and devotion contributed in distinct ways to American nursing practice. Yet, much of nursing history has involved the study of an articulate elite group of women. By studying nuns as nurses, we see another history, one that predates the well-known tradition established by Florence Nightingale. Conclusion: Fundamental changes in the organization and delivery of health care are challenging the role of health care institutions and redefining the nurse's position within the health care system. An understanding of the history of nursing offers a vital perspective on the political, ethical, and social forces that have shaped our nursing practice. Indeed, historical research provides the foundation of “evidence-based practice.” Implications: This paper can enhance theoretical understandings of the links between nursing practice, ethnicity, gender, economics, and religion that have been invisible in much of modern scholarship.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIrish Catholic Sisters and Nursing in America, 1865-1925en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155616-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Irish Catholic Sisters and Nursing in America, 1865-1925</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wall, Barbra, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Purdue University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor, Purdue University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bwall@nursing.purdue.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To examine the nursing of Irish immigrant nuns in the United States in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and their distinct beliefs and cultural traditions that they brought with them from Ireland that proved extremely useful as they negotiated new boundaries in the expanding nursing field. Design: Historical argument, exposition, and narrative are used to highlight the thesis that Irish sisters created hospitals where a specific, socially beneficial type of nursing care could be provided. Method: Historical methodology has involved seeking and evaluating evidence in primary sources located in the sisters&rsquo; archives. Specifically, methods of social and cultural history are used. Population/Years: Irish immigrant sister-nurses in the United States will be the focus. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Ireland was a fertile field for gleaning recruits for hospitals in America. Findings: Irish sister-nurses were a significant presence in the labor force of American hospitals. Their strong sense of self, their optimism, and a rigorous Irish Catholicism that emphasized discipline, obedience, and devotion contributed in distinct ways to American nursing practice. Yet, much of nursing history has involved the study of an articulate elite group of women. By studying nuns as nurses, we see another history, one that predates the well-known tradition established by Florence Nightingale. Conclusion: Fundamental changes in the organization and delivery of health care are challenging the role of health care institutions and redefining the nurse's position within the health care system. An understanding of the history of nursing offers a vital perspective on the political, ethical, and social forces that have shaped our nursing practice. Indeed, historical research provides the foundation of &ldquo;evidence-based practice.&rdquo; Implications: This paper can enhance theoretical understandings of the links between nursing practice, ethnicity, gender, economics, and religion that have been invisible in much of modern scholarship.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:00:32Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:00:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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