Intimate Partner Violence as a Predictor of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Severity in Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155617
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Intimate Partner Violence as a Predictor of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Severity in Women
Abstract:
Intimate Partner Violence as a Predictor of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Severity in Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Wineman, N. Margaret, RN, PhD, CNS, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Akron
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Stephanie J. Woods, RN, PhD; Melissa K. Zupancic, RN, CS, APRN, BC
Objective: The purpose of this research was to examine the relationship between five types of intimate partner violence (IPV) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and its symptom clusters of avoidance, intrusion/re-experiencing, and hyperarousal. Design: A cross-sectional, predictive-correlational design was used. Sample, Setting, Years: A convenience sample of 126 abused women (48% Caucasian, 37% African American, 4% Hispanic, and 5% American Indian/Alaskan Native or Asian/Pacific Islander), who have been in an abusive intimate relationship an average of 6 years, was recruited in 2002. Mean age was 34.05 (SD 9.07) years. Concepts: Five types of intimate partner violence (physical abuse, psychological/emotional abuse, sexual violence, threats of violence, and risk of homicide) were assessed. PTSD and its symptom clusters were also measured by the PSS. Methods: Descriptive, correlational, and multiple regression analyses were used. Findings: Together, the five types of IPV explained 45% of the variance in PTSD symptom severity (F = 21.43, p Conclusions: These ethnically diverse women experienced various types of intimate partner violence that influenced the severity of PTSD symptomatology as well as the individual symptom clusters. Emotional abuse appeared to have a strong and unique influence on the intensity of PTSD symptom severity. Implications: These findings provide evidence for assessment. Nurses need to gather specific information about the various types of violence a woman may have experienced as the type may have a differential effect on PTSD symptom severity. This information also provides direction for individualizing interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntimate Partner Violence as a Predictor of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Severity in Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155617-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Intimate Partner Violence as a Predictor of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Severity in Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wineman, N. Margaret, RN, PhD, CNS, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wineman@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Stephanie J. Woods, RN, PhD; Melissa K. Zupancic, RN, CS, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this research was to examine the relationship between five types of intimate partner violence (IPV) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and its symptom clusters of avoidance, intrusion/re-experiencing, and hyperarousal. Design: A cross-sectional, predictive-correlational design was used. Sample, Setting, Years: A convenience sample of 126 abused women (48% Caucasian, 37% African American, 4% Hispanic, and 5% American Indian/Alaskan Native or Asian/Pacific Islander), who have been in an abusive intimate relationship an average of 6 years, was recruited in 2002. Mean age was 34.05 (SD 9.07) years. Concepts: Five types of intimate partner violence (physical abuse, psychological/emotional abuse, sexual violence, threats of violence, and risk of homicide) were assessed. PTSD and its symptom clusters were also measured by the PSS. Methods: Descriptive, correlational, and multiple regression analyses were used. Findings: Together, the five types of IPV explained 45% of the variance in PTSD symptom severity (F = 21.43, p Conclusions: These ethnically diverse women experienced various types of intimate partner violence that influenced the severity of PTSD symptomatology as well as the individual symptom clusters. Emotional abuse appeared to have a strong and unique influence on the intensity of PTSD symptom severity. Implications: These findings provide evidence for assessment. Nurses need to gather specific information about the various types of violence a woman may have experienced as the type may have a differential effect on PTSD symptom severity. This information also provides direction for individualizing interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:00:35Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:00:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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