2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155620
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quandaries and Queries in Using Grounded Theory for Instrument Development
Abstract:
Quandaries and Queries in Using Grounded Theory for Instrument Development
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Wuest, Judith A., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Brunswick
Title:Professor & Canadian Institutes of Health Research Investigator
Co-Authors:Marilyn J. Hodgins, RN, PhD; Marilyn Merritt-Gray, RN, MN; Patricia Searman, RN, MN; Jean Malcolm, BA; Karen Furlong, BN
Objective:To discuss the pragmatic challenges and ontological questions underpinning instrument development based on grounded theory. Design: Instrument Development Methods:Item construction and evaluation based on grounded theory. Issues: Based on the assumption that inductively-derived theories should be later tested using traditional scientific methods, qualitative research methods sometimes are called initial steps in theory development. Some argue that grounded theory is particularly useful in instrument development because the theoretical properties of concepts are thoroughly explicated by the substantive model. Consequently, scale items representative of the concept can readily be generated from the model. In contrast, others suggest that the grounded theory method results in a context-specific, explanatory theory that is open to modification. As such, it is not a predictive theory from which hypotheses can be derived to test causal relationships in an objective and static reality. Our use of a substantive theory of women’s caring to guide scale development provides an opportunity to explore these opposing views. Scale items were developed as a basis for testing the substantive theory; in particular, whether past relationship with the care recipient, and obligation to care influence the health outcomes, and health promotion activities of female caregivers. The scale was piloted with 50 female caregivers of adult family members in a rural Canadian province. In this paper, we discuss the pragmatic difficulties of quantifying a qualitatively-derived theory, and how this process has illuminated the ontological questions underpinning instrument development. Specific issues include a) how conceptual definitions derived from a grounded theory present challenges for concept validation using a panel of experts, and b) how variation in conceptual properties resulting in item heterogeneity create difficulties in scale development.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuandaries and Queries in Using Grounded Theory for Instrument Developmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155620-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Quandaries and Queries in Using Grounded Theory for Instrument Development</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wuest, Judith A., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Brunswick</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor &amp; Canadian Institutes of Health Research Investigator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wuest@unb.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marilyn J. Hodgins, RN, PhD; Marilyn Merritt-Gray, RN, MN; Patricia Searman, RN, MN; Jean Malcolm, BA; Karen Furlong, BN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective:To discuss the pragmatic challenges and ontological questions underpinning instrument development based on grounded theory. Design: Instrument Development Methods:Item construction and evaluation based on grounded theory. Issues: Based on the assumption that inductively-derived theories should be later tested using traditional scientific methods, qualitative research methods sometimes are called initial steps in theory development. Some argue that grounded theory is particularly useful in instrument development because the theoretical properties of concepts are thoroughly explicated by the substantive model. Consequently, scale items representative of the concept can readily be generated from the model. In contrast, others suggest that the grounded theory method results in a context-specific, explanatory theory that is open to modification. As such, it is not a predictive theory from which hypotheses can be derived to test causal relationships in an objective and static reality. Our use of a substantive theory of women&rsquo;s caring to guide scale development provides an opportunity to explore these opposing views. Scale items were developed as a basis for testing the substantive theory; in particular, whether past relationship with the care recipient, and obligation to care influence the health outcomes, and health promotion activities of female caregivers. The scale was piloted with 50 female caregivers of adult family members in a rural Canadian province. In this paper, we discuss the pragmatic difficulties of quantifying a qualitatively-derived theory, and how this process has illuminated the ontological questions underpinning instrument development. Specific issues include a) how conceptual definitions derived from a grounded theory present challenges for concept validation using a panel of experts, and b) how variation in conceptual properties resulting in item heterogeneity create difficulties in scale development.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:00:47Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:00:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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