2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155628
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PDA and EBP at a Community Free Clinic
Abstract:
PDA and EBP at a Community Free Clinic
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 21, 2004
Author:Curran, Mary Alyce, PhD, RN, CS, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Kent Edward Curran, MBA, DBA; Carolyn K. Maynard, PhD, RN, CS, FNP
Objective: What has been learned in research settings is often not implemented into daily clinical practice. This lack of diffusion seems especially relevant for the multi-problem health care needs of the underserved. Systems are expected to assist with prompt and appropriate dissemination of health care information/knowledge. Personal digital assistants (PDAs) appear to be a current technology that may be able to promote the implementation and use of Evidence-based practice (EBP) guidelines. Problems arise however, in determining how to best format them for use. Design: This paper presents a pilot project exploring the use of PDA technology to enhance evidenced-based practice for an underserved population. Population, Sample, Setting: Patients and health care providers at a rural/urban community free clinic participated in the development of PDA-delivered guidelines (diabetes and hypertension). Methods: The project necessitated two development areas: guidelines and technology. A comprehensive literature review determined “best practices” for adults with Type 2 Diabetes mellitus and/or hypertension. PDA software was evaluated and selected for guideline development and delivery. Building the software and user-interface followed an iterative process. Survey questionnaires and one-on-one interviews provided insight and direction. Conclusions/Implications: PDAs seem to offer innovative approaches to EBP application to the underserved. However, limitations in information access, push/pull technology software/hardware capabilities and interface development present interesting challenges. Further research is needed to determine the best methods for implementing EBP guidelines through the use of PDAs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePDA and EBP at a Community Free Clinicen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155628-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">PDA and EBP at a Community Free Clinic</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 21, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Curran, Mary Alyce, PhD, RN, CS, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Carolina at Charlotte</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">macurran@email.uncc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kent Edward Curran, MBA, DBA; Carolyn K. Maynard, PhD, RN, CS, FNP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: What has been learned in research settings is often not implemented into daily clinical practice. This lack of diffusion seems especially relevant for the multi-problem health care needs of the underserved. Systems are expected to assist with prompt and appropriate dissemination of health care information/knowledge. Personal digital assistants (PDAs) appear to be a current technology that may be able to promote the implementation and use of Evidence-based practice (EBP) guidelines. Problems arise however, in determining how to best format them for use. Design: This paper presents a pilot project exploring the use of PDA technology to enhance evidenced-based practice for an underserved population. Population, Sample, Setting: Patients and health care providers at a rural/urban community free clinic participated in the development of PDA-delivered guidelines (diabetes and hypertension). Methods: The project necessitated two development areas: guidelines and technology. A comprehensive literature review determined &ldquo;best practices&rdquo; for adults with Type 2 Diabetes mellitus and/or hypertension. PDA software was evaluated and selected for guideline development and delivery. Building the software and user-interface followed an iterative process. Survey questionnaires and one-on-one interviews provided insight and direction. Conclusions/Implications: PDAs seem to offer innovative approaches to EBP application to the underserved. However, limitations in information access, push/pull technology software/hardware capabilities and interface development present interesting challenges. Further research is needed to determine the best methods for implementing EBP guidelines through the use of PDAs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:01:15Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-21en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:01:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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