Disparity of Diabetes Care Quality Between Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Individuals in Eastern Taiwan

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155656
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Disparity of Diabetes Care Quality Between Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Individuals in Eastern Taiwan
Abstract:
Disparity of Diabetes Care Quality Between Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Individuals in Eastern Taiwan
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Chang, Shu-Chuan, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:1. Buddhist Tzu-Chi General Hospital 2. Tzu Chi University
Title:1. Director 2. Associate Professor
Diabetes has been a difficultly controlled health problem in Taiwan, particularly in Hualien, in which one-fourths of population is aboriginal people. Most of aboriginals were living in the areas geographically a long distance from medical services. This cross-sectional study examined the disparity of quality and outcomes of diabetes care between aboriginal and non-aboriginal population in Hualien, Taiwan. One hundred forty participants were randomly selected from the list of individuals with diabetes who were seen at the medical center in Hualien during 2000 and 2001. Data collection included administering questionnaires through the mail or, if participants could not read or preferred being asked, by direct interview in early 2003 and reviewing medical records over the course of the year 2002. Results showed that aboriginal participants were younger (M = 53.07 and 59.02, respectively) yet had higher levels of comorbidity than non-aboriginal participants in the study. However, because of geographical distance to diabetes care institutes, aborigine people were more likely to visit primary care clinics instead of institutes with better preparation of diabetes care. Although the care received to prevent complications were no difference between the two groups, more over, aboriginal individuals received more referrals and home and phone visits from other professionals beyond physicians, their outcomes of diabetes care including self-care activities (M = 22.40 and 27.02, respectively, F (1,138) = 6.95, p
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDisparity of Diabetes Care Quality Between Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Individuals in Eastern Taiwanen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155656-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Disparity of Diabetes Care Quality Between Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Individuals in Eastern Taiwan</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chang, Shu-Chuan, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">1. Buddhist Tzu-Chi General Hospital 2. Tzu Chi University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">1. Director 2. Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">scchang@mail.tcu.edu.tw</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Diabetes has been a difficultly controlled health problem in Taiwan, particularly in Hualien, in which one-fourths of population is aboriginal people. Most of aboriginals were living in the areas geographically a long distance from medical services. This cross-sectional study examined the disparity of quality and outcomes of diabetes care between aboriginal and non-aboriginal population in Hualien, Taiwan. One hundred forty participants were randomly selected from the list of individuals with diabetes who were seen at the medical center in Hualien during 2000 and 2001. Data collection included administering questionnaires through the mail or, if participants could not read or preferred being asked, by direct interview in early 2003 and reviewing medical records over the course of the year 2002. Results showed that aboriginal participants were younger (M = 53.07 and 59.02, respectively) yet had higher levels of comorbidity than non-aboriginal participants in the study. However, because of geographical distance to diabetes care institutes, aborigine people were more likely to visit primary care clinics instead of institutes with better preparation of diabetes care. Although the care received to prevent complications were no difference between the two groups, more over, aboriginal individuals received more referrals and home and phone visits from other professionals beyond physicians, their outcomes of diabetes care including self-care activities (M = 22.40 and 27.02, respectively, F (1,138) = 6.95, p</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:02:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:02:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.