Life Changes in Individuals Diagnosed With Sleep Apnea While Accommodating to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Devices

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155667
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Life Changes in Individuals Diagnosed With Sleep Apnea While Accommodating to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Devices
Abstract:
Life Changes in Individuals Diagnosed With Sleep Apnea While Accommodating to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Devices
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Dickerson, Suzanne Steffan, RN, DNS
P.I. Institution Name:University at Buffalo, State University of New York
Title:assistant professor
Objective: Individuals' diagnosed with sleep apnea have difficulty complying with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatments. The purpose of this study was to longitudinally discover the experiences of individuals with sleep apnea who use CPAP. The specific aims were to: (1) understand the experiences using CPAP after diagnosis, one month and three months, (2) understand how individuals accommodate to the imposition of CPAP, and (3) understand the motivation to persisting with CPAP use. Design: A hermeneutic phenomenology approach was used to understand human experience through analysis of narrative text. Twenty informants were individually interviewed at diagnosis and one and three-month's and asked to tell their stories of CPAP use. Sample: Staff from a local sleep center invited newly diagnosed patients to participate. Method: Informants, who agreed gave their name and phone number to the researchers. The researchers contacted them and explained the study. The interviews were scheduled at a convenient time and location, and were audio taped and transcribed providing data for interpretive analysis. Findings: 6 related themes and one constitutive pattern described the experience including:(1) worsening symptoms initiate seeking help, (2) trouble with using CPAP (3) needing to persist through initial and recurring frustration, (4) difficulty recognizing subtle improvements (5) accessing help and problem-solving, and (6) becoming part of a routine or abandoning the device. Constitutive pattern: Persevering through tribulations by developing a positive-mindset. Conclusions: Sleep apnea patients' symptom severity and subsequent improvements with CPAP treatment influenced their motivations to persist. Those who have more subtle symptoms and have difficulty obtaining a properly working device do not persist. Implications: Nurses understanding the difficulties in complying with CPAP treatment, may assist patients with device issues and offer encouragement for CPAP use. The CPAP treatment prevents the physiological effects of non-restorative sleep.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLife Changes in Individuals Diagnosed With Sleep Apnea While Accommodating to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Devicesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155667-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Life Changes in Individuals Diagnosed With Sleep Apnea While Accommodating to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Devices</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dickerson, Suzanne Steffan, RN, DNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University at Buffalo, State University of New York</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">assistant professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sdickers@buffalo.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Individuals' diagnosed with sleep apnea have difficulty complying with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatments. The purpose of this study was to longitudinally discover the experiences of individuals with sleep apnea who use CPAP. The specific aims were to: (1) understand the experiences using CPAP after diagnosis, one month and three months, (2) understand how individuals accommodate to the imposition of CPAP, and (3) understand the motivation to persisting with CPAP use. Design: A hermeneutic phenomenology approach was used to understand human experience through analysis of narrative text. Twenty informants were individually interviewed at diagnosis and one and three-month's and asked to tell their stories of CPAP use. Sample: Staff from a local sleep center invited newly diagnosed patients to participate. Method: Informants, who agreed gave their name and phone number to the researchers. The researchers contacted them and explained the study. The interviews were scheduled at a convenient time and location, and were audio taped and transcribed providing data for interpretive analysis. Findings: 6 related themes and one constitutive pattern described the experience including:(1) worsening symptoms initiate seeking help, (2) trouble with using CPAP (3) needing to persist through initial and recurring frustration, (4) difficulty recognizing subtle improvements (5) accessing help and problem-solving, and (6) becoming part of a routine or abandoning the device. Constitutive pattern: Persevering through tribulations by developing a positive-mindset. Conclusions: Sleep apnea patients' symptom severity and subsequent improvements with CPAP treatment influenced their motivations to persist. Those who have more subtle symptoms and have difficulty obtaining a properly working device do not persist. Implications: Nurses understanding the difficulties in complying with CPAP treatment, may assist patients with device issues and offer encouragement for CPAP use. The CPAP treatment prevents the physiological effects of non-restorative sleep.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:03:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:03:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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