2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155670
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evolution of Ethical Thinking About Genetic Testing in Children
Abstract:
Evolution of Ethical Thinking About Genetic Testing in Children
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Twomey, John G., PhD, PNP
P.I. Institution Name:Room 305
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow in clinical Genetics
Background: Since the inception of the Ethical, Legal, and Social Aspects Program (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project in 1990, a large part of the of the Program's efforts have been devoted to setting a research agenda for examining the effects of the genomic revolution on the health of individuals in our society. Within this area, a specific topic that has elicited much concern has been the genetic testing of children (GTIC). The original conceptual framework that most of the researchers and commentators used when examining the issues of GTIC has been the principled approach, where individual-centered concepts such as autonomy are a unit of analysis. Theoretical Framework: Ethical analysis of clinical issues typically is approached from a principled theoretical framework. The author proposes that alternative ethical frameworks may better explain clinical decisions about GTIC. Research Question: What trends has the ethical analysis of GTIC followed in the last 15 years? Methods: Using the OVID search engine, a representative sample of theory and data-based reports from representative, peer-reviewed journals from both the bioethical and genetics literature within the past 10 years will be examined to determine what bioethical frameworks authors/researchers are using to analyze the issues involved in GTIC. Reports will describe numbers of articles in the sample while reporting whether the theoretical framework of analysis is 1) principle-based; 2) non-principled theory based; or 3) a blend of more than one theoretical framework. Significance of the Study: In a review of the literature for his own GTIC study (Twomey et al. 2004, STT, Dublin), the author found trends suggest a shift from a mostly principled theoretical base to the inclusion of other ethical models. A formal review of the literature is necessary to document such a shift and to begin analyzing its implications for the ethics of GTIC.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvolution of Ethical Thinking About Genetic Testing in Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155670-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evolution of Ethical Thinking About Genetic Testing in Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Twomey, John G., PhD, PNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Room 305</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow in clinical Genetics</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jtwomey2@cox.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Since the inception of the Ethical, Legal, and Social Aspects Program (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project in 1990, a large part of the of the Program's efforts have been devoted to setting a research agenda for examining the effects of the genomic revolution on the health of individuals in our society. Within this area, a specific topic that has elicited much concern has been the genetic testing of children (GTIC). The original conceptual framework that most of the researchers and commentators used when examining the issues of GTIC has been the principled approach, where individual-centered concepts such as autonomy are a unit of analysis. Theoretical Framework: Ethical analysis of clinical issues typically is approached from a principled theoretical framework. The author proposes that alternative ethical frameworks may better explain clinical decisions about GTIC. Research Question: What trends has the ethical analysis of GTIC followed in the last 15 years? Methods: Using the OVID search engine, a representative sample of theory and data-based reports from representative, peer-reviewed journals from both the bioethical and genetics literature within the past 10 years will be examined to determine what bioethical frameworks authors/researchers are using to analyze the issues involved in GTIC. Reports will describe numbers of articles in the sample while reporting whether the theoretical framework of analysis is 1) principle-based; 2) non-principled theory based; or 3) a blend of more than one theoretical framework. Significance of the Study: In a review of the literature for his own GTIC study (Twomey et al. 2004, STT, Dublin), the author found trends suggest a shift from a mostly principled theoretical base to the inclusion of other ethical models. A formal review of the literature is necessary to document such a shift and to begin analyzing its implications for the ethics of GTIC.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:03:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:03:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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