2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155673
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Folic Acid Intake among Young Women
Abstract:
Improving Folic Acid Intake among Young Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Krowchuk, Heidi VonKoss, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Robin M. Lester, MPH, CHES; Anna Bess Brown, MPH, CHES
Objective: To identify 1) knowledge about folic acid's role in preventing neural tube defects (NTDs), 2) frequency of intake folic acid; and 3) effectiveness of peer education in improving folic acid consumption and knowledge, among college-age women Design: Descriptive study. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The target population was women attending college at one of 50 campuses in North Carolina from 2001-2004. The sample consisted of 5,670 women (mean age: 19.4 ¦ 2.6 yrs.) participating in folic-acid educational sessions. Methods: A pre-test to determine baseline folic acid knowledge, folic acid use, and factors influencing folic acid intake (22 item questionnaire, reliability =.89) was administered to 5,670 participants. Two health educators and 40 students trained as folic acid peer educators provided educational sessions to participants in small groups. A 100-day supply of a multivitamin was provided to participants after completion of an educational session, and a post-test to determine folic acid use (self-report, verified by vitamin count) folic acid knowledge, and factors influencing folic acid intake (24 item questionnaire, reliability = .87) were administered to 40% of the participants at 1 month and 1 year after session participation. Results: At enrollment, 55% had heard of folic acid, 45% knew NTDs could be prevented with multivitamins, and 32% knew preconceptional vitamin use was necessary. Only 30% reported taking daily folic acid supplementation prior to participation in the educational session. Post-test scores demonstrated a statistically significant increase in women's knowledge about folic acid; 82% reported daily folic acid consumption (verified by vitamin count) at 1-month follow-up. At 1-year follow-up, 62% reported daily folic acid consumption, and knowledge scores remained improved. Conclusions: Focused folic acid peer education improves knowledge, and providing multivitamins increases use among young women. The combined strategy of education and multivitamin distribution may facilitate a continuation of daily adherence to multivitamins.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Folic Acid Intake among Young Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155673-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Improving Folic Acid Intake among Young Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Krowchuk, Heidi VonKoss, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of North Carolina at Greensboro</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hvkrowch@uncg.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Robin M. Lester, MPH, CHES; Anna Bess Brown, MPH, CHES</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To identify 1) knowledge about folic acid's role in preventing neural tube defects (NTDs), 2) frequency of intake folic acid; and 3) effectiveness of peer education in improving folic acid consumption and knowledge, among college-age women Design: Descriptive study. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The target population was women attending college at one of 50 campuses in North Carolina from 2001-2004. The sample consisted of 5,670 women (mean age: 19.4 &brvbar; 2.6 yrs.) participating in folic-acid educational sessions. Methods: A pre-test to determine baseline folic acid knowledge, folic acid use, and factors influencing folic acid intake (22 item questionnaire, reliability =.89) was administered to 5,670 participants. Two health educators and 40 students trained as folic acid peer educators provided educational sessions to participants in small groups. A 100-day supply of a multivitamin was provided to participants after completion of an educational session, and a post-test to determine folic acid use (self-report, verified by vitamin count) folic acid knowledge, and factors influencing folic acid intake (24 item questionnaire, reliability = .87) were administered to 40% of the participants at 1 month and 1 year after session participation. Results: At enrollment, 55% had heard of folic acid, 45% knew NTDs could be prevented with multivitamins, and 32% knew preconceptional vitamin use was necessary. Only 30% reported taking daily folic acid supplementation prior to participation in the educational session. Post-test scores demonstrated a statistically significant increase in women's knowledge about folic acid; 82% reported daily folic acid consumption (verified by vitamin count) at 1-month follow-up. At 1-year follow-up, 62% reported daily folic acid consumption, and knowledge scores remained improved. Conclusions: Focused folic acid peer education improves knowledge, and providing multivitamins increases use among young women. The combined strategy of education and multivitamin distribution may facilitate a continuation of daily adherence to multivitamins.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:03:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:03:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.