Questioning Current Practice: Using a Systematic Review to Identify Safe and Effective Assessment of the Preterm Infant's Readiness to Feed

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155675
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Questioning Current Practice: Using a Systematic Review to Identify Safe and Effective Assessment of the Preterm Infant's Readiness to Feed
Abstract:
Questioning Current Practice: Using a Systematic Review to Identify Safe and Effective Assessment of the Preterm Infant's Readiness to Feed
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Crowe, Linda Marie, RN, EM, MMid
P.I. Institution Name:Mater Health Services
Title:Ms
Co-Authors:Anne M. Chang, RN, DipNEd, BEdSt, MEdSt, PhD; Karen Louise Wallace, RN, EM, GradDipMid
Unlike most full-term infants who are able to safely feed soon after birth, preterm infants often take time to transition from gavage feeding to exclusive breast or bottle feeds. The time taken to transition is inconsistent and dependent on a variety of factors including the infant's developmental maturity. Gestational age has been commonly used in practice as an indicator of developmental maturity and therefore readiness to commence oral feeding. However, recent studies have found that although gestational age is a guide to expected maturity there are differences in the rates that infants mature. The impact of using gestational age as an indicator is not fully understood but it is thought that it may cause unnecessary delay in commencement of feeding in some infants while pushing others who are less developmentally mature. Both of these situations have the potential to cause undue stress on infant and mother and delayed discharge. As a result some nurses are questioning whether the ôroutineö practice of commencing feeds at a particular gestational age is appropriate. A more accurate and effective approach may be to assess individual infant's readiness to feed. Evidence to substantiate the effectiveness of methods to assess preterm infant's readiness to feed is unknown and a systematic review or clinical guideline is needed. Such a review is currently underway. An outcome of this review is to ensure that care provided is current, beneficial and relevant to nurses, infants and mothers. This paper will examine the different approaches to assessing readiness to feed in preterm infants including the benefits and limitations of these methods. The current gaps of knowledge and future direction of feeding assessment will be discussed. A brief overview of the process involved in conducting this systematic review will also be given.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuestioning Current Practice: Using a Systematic Review to Identify Safe and Effective Assessment of the Preterm Infant's Readiness to Feeden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155675-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Questioning Current Practice: Using a Systematic Review to Identify Safe and Effective Assessment of the Preterm Infant's Readiness to Feed</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Crowe, Linda Marie, RN, EM, MMid</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mater Health Services</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Ms</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">NR@mater.org.au</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Anne M. Chang, RN, DipNEd, BEdSt, MEdSt, PhD; Karen Louise Wallace, RN, EM, GradDipMid</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Unlike most full-term infants who are able to safely feed soon after birth, preterm infants often take time to transition from gavage feeding to exclusive breast or bottle feeds. The time taken to transition is inconsistent and dependent on a variety of factors including the infant's developmental maturity. Gestational age has been commonly used in practice as an indicator of developmental maturity and therefore readiness to commence oral feeding. However, recent studies have found that although gestational age is a guide to expected maturity there are differences in the rates that infants mature. The impact of using gestational age as an indicator is not fully understood but it is thought that it may cause unnecessary delay in commencement of feeding in some infants while pushing others who are less developmentally mature. Both of these situations have the potential to cause undue stress on infant and mother and delayed discharge. As a result some nurses are questioning whether the &ocirc;routine&ouml; practice of commencing feeds at a particular gestational age is appropriate. A more accurate and effective approach may be to assess individual infant's readiness to feed. Evidence to substantiate the effectiveness of methods to assess preterm infant's readiness to feed is unknown and a systematic review or clinical guideline is needed. Such a review is currently underway. An outcome of this review is to ensure that care provided is current, beneficial and relevant to nurses, infants and mothers. This paper will examine the different approaches to assessing readiness to feed in preterm infants including the benefits and limitations of these methods. The current gaps of knowledge and future direction of feeding assessment will be discussed. A brief overview of the process involved in conducting this systematic review will also be given.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:04:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:04:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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