2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155676
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Identifying African American Grand Families' HIV Risk Reduction Behaviors
Abstract:
Identifying African American Grand Families' HIV Risk Reduction Behaviors
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Cornelius, Judith, RN, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pennsylvania
Title:Post Doctoral Research Fellow
Background: AIDS disproportionately affects African-American families. As a result of HIV infection and death, increasing numbers of grandparents are providing permanent care to their grandchildren. Census figures estimate that the number of African-American grandchildren living with their grandparents is three times higher than that of white grandchildren. There is empirical data on the role of parents in providing HIV risk reduction education to their adolescent children however; there is a lack of evidence about the role of grandparents in providing HIV risk reduction education to their grandchildren. The purpose of this study was to identify HIV risk reduction behaviors of African-American grandparents and their adolescent grandchildren. Methods: The design of this study was quasi-experimental. Forty grandparents and one of their adolescent grandchildren (n = 40) completed the 57-item HIV Risk Reduction Behavior Survey. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, and Pearson correlation tests were used to describe and correlate selected variables. Findings: The grandparents were primarily female, ranged in age from 52 to 72 years and were mostly retired. The adolescent grandchildren were primarily female and ranged in age from 13 to 15 years. There was a significant difference between the two groups in regards to attitudes about HIV risk reduction communication (t= 4.055 p < 0.05) with the grandparents having more favorable attitudes than their grandchildren. There was a significant relationship between sexuality communication and attitudes toward sexuality issues (r = .401 p <0.01). Implications: Grand families need HIV educational programs tailored specially to meet their needs. As grandparents continue to assume the role of parents there is a need for continued research on how their grandchildren fare socially.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIdentifying African American Grand Families' HIV Risk Reduction Behaviorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155676-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Identifying African American Grand Families' HIV Risk Reduction Behaviors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cornelius, Judith, RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pennsylvania</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Research Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cornajas@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: AIDS disproportionately affects African-American families. As a result of HIV infection and death, increasing numbers of grandparents are providing permanent care to their grandchildren. Census figures estimate that the number of African-American grandchildren living with their grandparents is three times higher than that of white grandchildren. There is empirical data on the role of parents in providing HIV risk reduction education to their adolescent children however; there is a lack of evidence about the role of grandparents in providing HIV risk reduction education to their grandchildren. The purpose of this study was to identify HIV risk reduction behaviors of African-American grandparents and their adolescent grandchildren. Methods: The design of this study was quasi-experimental. Forty grandparents and one of their adolescent grandchildren (n = 40) completed the 57-item HIV Risk Reduction Behavior Survey. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, and Pearson correlation tests were used to describe and correlate selected variables. Findings: The grandparents were primarily female, ranged in age from 52 to 72 years and were mostly retired. The adolescent grandchildren were primarily female and ranged in age from 13 to 15 years. There was a significant difference between the two groups in regards to attitudes about HIV risk reduction communication (t= 4.055 p &lt; 0.05) with the grandparents having more favorable attitudes than their grandchildren. There was a significant relationship between sexuality communication and attitudes toward sexuality issues (r = .401 p &lt;0.01). Implications: Grand families need HIV educational programs tailored specially to meet their needs. As grandparents continue to assume the role of parents there is a need for continued research on how their grandchildren fare socially.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:04:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:04:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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