2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155677
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Empirical Determinants of Postpartum Depression
Abstract:
Empirical Determinants of Postpartum Depression
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Records, Kathie, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Michael Rice, PhD, ARNP, BC
Research emphasis has been on the devastating consequences of postpartum depression and identification of risk factors. Few studies include the confounding variables of previous depression or abuse. The purpose of this study was to describe the relationships between abuse, postpartum depression, prenatal health, and select demographics to identify the determinants of postpartum depression. A longitudinal design, guided by stress response theory, was used. Women (N = 139) in their third trimester of pregnancy were recruited from care provider's offices or through self-referral. The sample had a mean age of 27 years (SD = 5.2). Ethnic representation approximated that of the locale: 88% Caucasian, 4% Hispanic, 4% Native American, 2 % Asian, and 1% African American. Abuse (Severity of Violence Against Women Scales), postpartum depression (Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale), and prenatal health (Childbearing Health Questionnaire, Centers for Epidemiology Depressed Mood Scale, Predictors of Postpartum Depression Inventory) were the variables. Data were collected in prenatal offices after informed consent was obtained. Data were collected using telephone and mailed surveys from 2-8 months postpartum. Linear regression indicated that the severity of postpartum depression (R2 = .910, p = .008) was due to the level of prenatal depression (Beta = .915), severity of violence experienced (Beta = -.475), relationship to the abuser (Beta = -.670), and having a prior postpartum depression (Beta = .672). As noted in other reports, age, gravida, socioecomomic status, and ethnicity did not predict depression. In contrast to other studies, support from the baby's father, use of alcohol, and a planned pregnancy had no direct effect on the level of postpartum depression. Results highlight the importance of evaluating depression and prior physical/sexual abuse during prenatal visits. Postnatal functioning is enhanced for at-risk women by adequate assessments, early intervention, and follow-up. Grant Support: National Institute of Nursing Research, 1R15 NR05311-01A2.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmpirical Determinants of Postpartum Depressionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155677-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Empirical Determinants of Postpartum Depression</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Records, Kathie, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">recordsk@wsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michael Rice, PhD, ARNP, BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Research emphasis has been on the devastating consequences of postpartum depression and identification of risk factors. Few studies include the confounding variables of previous depression or abuse. The purpose of this study was to describe the relationships between abuse, postpartum depression, prenatal health, and select demographics to identify the determinants of postpartum depression. A longitudinal design, guided by stress response theory, was used. Women (N = 139) in their third trimester of pregnancy were recruited from care provider's offices or through self-referral. The sample had a mean age of 27 years (SD = 5.2). Ethnic representation approximated that of the locale: 88% Caucasian, 4% Hispanic, 4% Native American, 2 % Asian, and 1% African American. Abuse (Severity of Violence Against Women Scales), postpartum depression (Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale), and prenatal health (Childbearing Health Questionnaire, Centers for Epidemiology Depressed Mood Scale, Predictors of Postpartum Depression Inventory) were the variables. Data were collected in prenatal offices after informed consent was obtained. Data were collected using telephone and mailed surveys from 2-8 months postpartum. Linear regression indicated that the severity of postpartum depression (R2 = .910, p = .008) was due to the level of prenatal depression (Beta = .915), severity of violence experienced (Beta = -.475), relationship to the abuser (Beta = -.670), and having a prior postpartum depression (Beta = .672). As noted in other reports, age, gravida, socioecomomic status, and ethnicity did not predict depression. In contrast to other studies, support from the baby's father, use of alcohol, and a planned pregnancy had no direct effect on the level of postpartum depression. Results highlight the importance of evaluating depression and prior physical/sexual abuse during prenatal visits. Postnatal functioning is enhanced for at-risk women by adequate assessments, early intervention, and follow-up. Grant Support: National Institute of Nursing Research, 1R15 NR05311-01A2.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:04:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:04:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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