The Moderating Effect of the Presence of a Friendly Dog on Elders' Cardiovascular Responses to a Mild Stressor

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155678
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Moderating Effect of the Presence of a Friendly Dog on Elders' Cardiovascular Responses to a Mild Stressor
Abstract:
The Moderating Effect of the Presence of a Friendly Dog on Elders' Cardiovascular Responses to a Mild Stressor
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Friedmann, Erika, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:School of Nursing, University of Maryland
Title:Professor and Chair, Department of Health and Nutrition Sciences
Co-Authors:Sue A. Thomas, PhD, RN, FAAN; Linda K. Cook, MS, RN, CCRN, CCNS, ACNP; Sandra J. F. Picot, PhD, RN, FAAN
Objective: This study was conducted to examine the moderating effect of the presence of a friendly dog on cardiovascular responses to a mild stressor of elderly individuals. Design: Experimental. Sample, Setting: A sample of 18 older adults (75-94 years old) residing independently in a continuing care community. All had resting blood pressure (BP) in the pre- to mild hypertensive range. The study was conducted in the participant's apartment. Variables Studied: BP and heart rate (HR). Methods: After screening informed consent was obtained, BP was measured twice on two occasions separated by at least one week to determine eligibility. If the volunteer met the BP inclusion criteria and was willing to participate, study informed consent was obtained and the elder participated in the experimental session. In the session, each participant completed two series of activities consisting of sitting quietly for 2 minutes, speaking to the nurse researcher about their daily activities (a mild stressor) for 2 minutes, and sitting quietly for 2 minutes while BP and heart rate (HR) were recorded at one-minute intervals with an automated oscillometric device. The series of activities was conducted twice in succession with a friendly dog present for one session. Order, dog present during the first or the second series, was counterbalanced. Findings: Mean arterial and systolic BP were significantly impacted by the combination of series, order, and activity (repeated measures MANOVA interaction p
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Moderating Effect of the Presence of a Friendly Dog on Elders' Cardiovascular Responses to a Mild Stressoren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155678-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Moderating Effect of the Presence of a Friendly Dog on Elders' Cardiovascular Responses to a Mild Stressor</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Friedmann, Erika, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, University of Maryland</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Chair, Department of Health and Nutrition Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">efrie002@son.umaryland.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sue A. Thomas, PhD, RN, FAAN; Linda K. Cook, MS, RN, CCRN, CCNS, ACNP; Sandra J. F. Picot, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This study was conducted to examine the moderating effect of the presence of a friendly dog on cardiovascular responses to a mild stressor of elderly individuals. Design: Experimental. Sample, Setting: A sample of 18 older adults (75-94 years old) residing independently in a continuing care community. All had resting blood pressure (BP) in the pre- to mild hypertensive range. The study was conducted in the participant's apartment. Variables Studied: BP and heart rate (HR). Methods: After screening informed consent was obtained, BP was measured twice on two occasions separated by at least one week to determine eligibility. If the volunteer met the BP inclusion criteria and was willing to participate, study informed consent was obtained and the elder participated in the experimental session. In the session, each participant completed two series of activities consisting of sitting quietly for 2 minutes, speaking to the nurse researcher about their daily activities (a mild stressor) for 2 minutes, and sitting quietly for 2 minutes while BP and heart rate (HR) were recorded at one-minute intervals with an automated oscillometric device. The series of activities was conducted twice in succession with a friendly dog present for one session. Order, dog present during the first or the second series, was counterbalanced. Findings: Mean arterial and systolic BP were significantly impacted by the combination of series, order, and activity (repeated measures MANOVA interaction p</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:04:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:04:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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