2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155690
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bridging Learning Barriers Related to Terrorism/Disaster Preparedness
Abstract:
Bridging Learning Barriers Related to Terrorism/Disaster Preparedness
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Young, Charlotte, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Arkansas State University
Title:Professor of Nursing
Co-Authors:Deborah J. Persell, MSN, RN, CPNP
Multiple terrorist events have created a sense of urgency for health professional faculty to teach bioterrorism preparedness. However, the consideration of bioterrorism often entails anxiety, which can act as a barrier to learning. Identifying specific areas of concern or potential barriers is an important first step. This integrated quantitative/ qualitative study identified the major concerns of health professionals related to bioterrorism preparedness and caring for victims of bioterrorism as well as their preferred focus and methods of education. As part of a larger study, an open-ended questionnaire was given to a stratified random sample of 500 professionals consisting of physicians, pharmacists, nurse practitioners and RN's representing a southern state in the USA. The questionnaire focused on concerns related to: bioterrorism, providing care to victims of bioterrorism, prescribing and/or administering drugs to victims of bioterrorism during mass casualty, and preferred focus and types of education. Qualitative data were analysed, using Colaizzi's phenomenological method of theme development (Colaizzi's (1978), until no new major themes emerged. Key participants, who were invited to review findings, concurred with results. Several major themes revealed invisible barriers to learning and learning motivation. Participants' perceived themselves as : 1) unprepared or lacking in knowledge and skill despite previous education and/or access to information, 2) fearful of negative side effect of medications and of having important resources withheld and 3) expecting to be excluded from giving care to victims in a mass casualty for various reasons. Professional aspirations and ethics provided a potential bridge enabling learning. Respondents' comments related to professional aspirations, learning needs and preferred methods of education provide some potential solutions to these barriers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBridging Learning Barriers Related to Terrorism/Disaster Preparednessen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155690-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Bridging Learning Barriers Related to Terrorism/Disaster Preparedness</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Young, Charlotte, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arkansas State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cyoung@astate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Deborah J. Persell, MSN, RN, CPNP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Multiple terrorist events have created a sense of urgency for health professional faculty to teach bioterrorism preparedness. However, the consideration of bioterrorism often entails anxiety, which can act as a barrier to learning. Identifying specific areas of concern or potential barriers is an important first step. This integrated quantitative/ qualitative study identified the major concerns of health professionals related to bioterrorism preparedness and caring for victims of bioterrorism as well as their preferred focus and methods of education. As part of a larger study, an open-ended questionnaire was given to a stratified random sample of 500 professionals consisting of physicians, pharmacists, nurse practitioners and RN's representing a southern state in the USA. The questionnaire focused on concerns related to: bioterrorism, providing care to victims of bioterrorism, prescribing and/or administering drugs to victims of bioterrorism during mass casualty, and preferred focus and types of education. Qualitative data were analysed, using Colaizzi's phenomenological method of theme development (Colaizzi's (1978), until no new major themes emerged. Key participants, who were invited to review findings, concurred with results. Several major themes revealed invisible barriers to learning and learning motivation. Participants' perceived themselves as : 1) unprepared or lacking in knowledge and skill despite previous education and/or access to information, 2) fearful of negative side effect of medications and of having important resources withheld and 3) expecting to be excluded from giving care to victims in a mass casualty for various reasons. Professional aspirations and ethics provided a potential bridge enabling learning. Respondents' comments related to professional aspirations, learning needs and preferred methods of education provide some potential solutions to these barriers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:04:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:04:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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