Promoting Active Learning Abilities and Lifelong Learning Perceptions in Academically At-Risk Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155692
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Promoting Active Learning Abilities and Lifelong Learning Perceptions in Academically At-Risk Students
Abstract:
Promoting Active Learning Abilities and Lifelong Learning Perceptions in Academically At-Risk Students
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Curl, Eileen Deges, PhD, ARNP-CNS
P.I. Institution Name:Lamar University
Title:Chairperson, Dept. of Nursing
Co-Authors:Mary Fran Skeels, APRN, BC, MSN, MSHP; Gina Hale, MSN, RN; Nancye McAfee, MSN, RN; Pat Morrell, MSN, RN; Beverly T. Hoffmeyer, BSN, RN; Pat Patterson, BSN, RN
Students' excitement about being accepted into a nursing program can dim when they realize that nursing courses require them to be active learners, who seek out knowledge and maximize available resources. Academically at-risk students may struggle to be active learners and may not use available learning resources because of family and work demands. To facilitate at-risk students' role transition to become active learners who value life-long learning, The Caring Place project was established combining case management and Modeling and Role Modeling theory. At-risk students were assigned a faculty Care Manager to promote students' use of learning resources on-campus and address personal issues impeding students' learning. Also, The Caring Place provided individual assistance with questions and small group facilitated learning sessions. At-risk students' perceptions of active learning and life long learning were studied using semi-structured interviews. Purposive selection was used to select six at-risk students (ADN = 4, BSN = 2) who participated in The Caring Place for two semesters and successfully progressed in the nursing program. Taped interviews were used to collect data from the students regarding their perception of active and life-long learning, and how The Caring Place impacted their perceptions. Content analysis of each transcribed interview was conducted, and trustworthiness of the themes identified was established. Examples of themes included perceiving The Caring Place as ôreinforcingö and giving a ôboostö to their active learning, and ôknocking down roadblocksö toward life-long learning. Results related to life-long learning were triangulated with visual analog scale data (before Caring Place M = 4.75; after M = 8.58). The findings suggest that The Caring Place project facilitated academically at-risk students' active and life-long learning. Retention of at-risk students may positively influence the number of graduates available to enter the workforce. Also, students' perception of life-long learning may benefit their nursing careers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePromoting Active Learning Abilities and Lifelong Learning Perceptions in Academically At-Risk Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155692-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Promoting Active Learning Abilities and Lifelong Learning Perceptions in Academically At-Risk Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Curl, Eileen Deges, PhD, ARNP-CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lamar University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Chairperson, Dept. of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">curled@hal.lamar.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Fran Skeels, APRN, BC, MSN, MSHP; Gina Hale, MSN, RN; Nancye McAfee, MSN, RN; Pat Morrell, MSN, RN; Beverly T. Hoffmeyer, BSN, RN; Pat Patterson, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Students' excitement about being accepted into a nursing program can dim when they realize that nursing courses require them to be active learners, who seek out knowledge and maximize available resources. Academically at-risk students may struggle to be active learners and may not use available learning resources because of family and work demands. To facilitate at-risk students' role transition to become active learners who value life-long learning, The Caring Place project was established combining case management and Modeling and Role Modeling theory. At-risk students were assigned a faculty Care Manager to promote students' use of learning resources on-campus and address personal issues impeding students' learning. Also, The Caring Place provided individual assistance with questions and small group facilitated learning sessions. At-risk students' perceptions of active learning and life long learning were studied using semi-structured interviews. Purposive selection was used to select six at-risk students (ADN = 4, BSN = 2) who participated in The Caring Place for two semesters and successfully progressed in the nursing program. Taped interviews were used to collect data from the students regarding their perception of active and life-long learning, and how The Caring Place impacted their perceptions. Content analysis of each transcribed interview was conducted, and trustworthiness of the themes identified was established. Examples of themes included perceiving The Caring Place as &ocirc;reinforcing&ouml; and giving a &ocirc;boost&ouml; to their active learning, and &ocirc;knocking down roadblocks&ouml; toward life-long learning. Results related to life-long learning were triangulated with visual analog scale data (before Caring Place M = 4.75; after M = 8.58). The findings suggest that The Caring Place project facilitated academically at-risk students' active and life-long learning. Retention of at-risk students may positively influence the number of graduates available to enter the workforce. Also, students' perception of life-long learning may benefit their nursing careers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:04:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:04:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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