2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155701
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Palliative Care of Chronically Ill Patients
Abstract:
Palliative Care of Chronically Ill Patients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Erickson-Hurt, Carma J., APRN-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Naval Medical Center
Title:Clinical Nurse Specialist
Co-Authors:Linnea Marie Axman, DrPH, MSN, C-FNP
Background: Dying patients continue to receive care in acute care hospital settings until the time of death. Death in hospitals is usually predictable, yet rarely well managed. Studies have demonstrated considerable unmet need for symptom control, psychological and social support, and communication among patients who die from chronic illnesses and their families. In response to these concerns, hospital-based palliative care programs have developed. Education and specialty training in palliative care improves outcomes. Objective: (1) Examine the effect of palliative care for chronically ill patients; (2) measure outcomes of evidence-based guidelines for comfort care; and (3) measure clinician adherence to evidence-based practices. Methods: A palliative care team was formed to review the evidence, provide recommendations, and develop a standardized protocol for patient's transferred from acute care units for ôcomfort measures onlyö. The Iowa Model of Research Based Practice to Promote Quality Care guided development of the protocol. The team designated two inpatient rooms as ôcomfort care suitesö and implemented the Comfort Care Protocol in December 2004. The protocol serves as an educational tool and guide for health care providers caring for this population of patients. Outcomes measures assess pain level, skin condition, breathing, elimination and other symptom control. Retrospective record reviews will compare outcomes for patients prior to and following implementation of the Comfort Care Protocol. Findings: Because the protocol was just implemented, reliable results are not available. Early evidence suggests that the transfer of dying patients from the Intensive Care Unit to comfort care suites for the final hours before death results in greater patient, family, and provider satisfaction with the care environment and cost savings to the institution. Providers have related that they enjoy greater collaboration in a setting in which nurse, patient, and physician are active participants in comfort care decision-making.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePalliative Care of Chronically Ill Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155701-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Palliative Care of Chronically Ill Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Erickson-Hurt, Carma J., APRN-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Naval Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cjerickson@nmcsd.med.navy.mil</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Linnea Marie Axman, DrPH, MSN, C-FNP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Dying patients continue to receive care in acute care hospital settings until the time of death. Death in hospitals is usually predictable, yet rarely well managed. Studies have demonstrated considerable unmet need for symptom control, psychological and social support, and communication among patients who die from chronic illnesses and their families. In response to these concerns, hospital-based palliative care programs have developed. Education and specialty training in palliative care improves outcomes. Objective: (1) Examine the effect of palliative care for chronically ill patients; (2) measure outcomes of evidence-based guidelines for comfort care; and (3) measure clinician adherence to evidence-based practices. Methods: A palliative care team was formed to review the evidence, provide recommendations, and develop a standardized protocol for patient's transferred from acute care units for &ocirc;comfort measures only&ouml;. The Iowa Model of Research Based Practice to Promote Quality Care guided development of the protocol. The team designated two inpatient rooms as &ocirc;comfort care suites&ouml; and implemented the Comfort Care Protocol in December 2004. The protocol serves as an educational tool and guide for health care providers caring for this population of patients. Outcomes measures assess pain level, skin condition, breathing, elimination and other symptom control. Retrospective record reviews will compare outcomes for patients prior to and following implementation of the Comfort Care Protocol. Findings: Because the protocol was just implemented, reliable results are not available. Early evidence suggests that the transfer of dying patients from the Intensive Care Unit to comfort care suites for the final hours before death results in greater patient, family, and provider satisfaction with the care environment and cost savings to the institution. Providers have related that they enjoy greater collaboration in a setting in which nurse, patient, and physician are active participants in comfort care decision-making.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:05:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:05:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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