2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155715
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Creating Interdisciplinary Partners for the Future
Abstract:
Creating Interdisciplinary Partners for the Future
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Strout, Tania D., RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Maine Medical Center
In my role as Research Nurse Coordinator for our Department of Emergency Medicine, I have the unique experience of living between the worlds of nursing and medicine. Having served many roles in nursing, medical, and interdisciplinary research projects, I have had the opportunity to observe colleagues from many disciplines interacting while completing research and evidence-based practice projects. Several years ago, we conducted a survey of our nursing and physician staff on their academic preparation around research and evidence-based practice. Results revealed that more baccalaureate or higher prepared nurses than physicians had completed a course specific to research, had been required to complete a research project, and had received education specific to evidence-based practice. Despite this, I have observed that research teams are most frequently led by physicians. Additionally, the work of my Clinical Scholar colleagues has often required the formal support of physicians prior to implementation. Rather than risking damage to collegial interdisciplinary relationships, I have begun to work for change at the very beginning. In working closely with each medical student and resident physician rotating thorough our department's research program, I have the opportunity to teach them the ways in which nurses have learned to perform research. In reviewing the literature, students learn to search across disciplines, to use the Schultz Critique Table, and to perform integrated reviews. They consider the ethics and holistic impact of their intervention on their patients, and are reminded to always include other disciplines in their peer review sessions. I encourage them to observe my Clinical Scholar colleagues acting as team leaders and PIs on their respective projects. I hope to give them a view of the nurse as scholar and research leader that they will take with them in their roles, allowing them to become fully interdisciplinary partners for the future.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCreating Interdisciplinary Partners for the Futureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155715-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Creating Interdisciplinary Partners for the Future</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Strout, Tania D., RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Maine Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">strout@mmc.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In my role as Research Nurse Coordinator for our Department of Emergency Medicine, I have the unique experience of living between the worlds of nursing and medicine. Having served many roles in nursing, medical, and interdisciplinary research projects, I have had the opportunity to observe colleagues from many disciplines interacting while completing research and evidence-based practice projects. Several years ago, we conducted a survey of our nursing and physician staff on their academic preparation around research and evidence-based practice. Results revealed that more baccalaureate or higher prepared nurses than physicians had completed a course specific to research, had been required to complete a research project, and had received education specific to evidence-based practice. Despite this, I have observed that research teams are most frequently led by physicians. Additionally, the work of my Clinical Scholar colleagues has often required the formal support of physicians prior to implementation. Rather than risking damage to collegial interdisciplinary relationships, I have begun to work for change at the very beginning. In working closely with each medical student and resident physician rotating thorough our department's research program, I have the opportunity to teach them the ways in which nurses have learned to perform research. In reviewing the literature, students learn to search across disciplines, to use the Schultz Critique Table, and to perform integrated reviews. They consider the ethics and holistic impact of their intervention on their patients, and are reminded to always include other disciplines in their peer review sessions. I encourage them to observe my Clinical Scholar colleagues acting as team leaders and PIs on their respective projects. I hope to give them a view of the nurse as scholar and research leader that they will take with them in their roles, allowing them to become fully interdisciplinary partners for the future.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:06:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:06:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.