Effectiveness of Home Nurse Intervention for Child Behavior and Parenting Stress in Drug Exposed Children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155731
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effectiveness of Home Nurse Intervention for Child Behavior and Parenting Stress in Drug Exposed Children
Abstract:
Effectiveness of Home Nurse Intervention for Child Behavior and Parenting Stress in Drug Exposed Children
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Butz, Arlene, ScD
P.I. Institution Name:Johns Hopkins University
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: To discuss the effectiveness of a nurse home intervention for in-utero drug exposed children in decreasing the number of children with emotional/behavioral problems at age 24-48 months. Design: Randomized, clinical trial suing repeat measures. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: 111 in-utero drug exposed (IUDE) children recruited from newborn nursery at a large urban hospital from December 1994 through November 1996 and 34 non drug exposed children followed through December 2000. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Child emotional and behavioral problems and parenting stress. Methods: This randomized clinical trial tested the effectiveness of a home nurse intervention in intervention (INT, n=54) versus Control (CON, n=57) children and compared outcomes with a group of non-drug exposed mothers (NONEXP, n=34). The home intervention consisted of 16 home visits over an 18-month period to provide health monitoring of the infant, parenting education and caregiver emotional support. Instrument included Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Parenting Stress Index (PSI). Findings: Subjects were primarily African American (98%), living with biological mother (72%), and type of in-utero drug exposure (IUDE) was primarily cocaine + opiates (58%), cocaine only (21%) and opiates only (21%). IUDE children were significantly more likely to have a behavior problem than non-drug exposed children (p=.02). Mean parenting stress scores (PSI) was significantly higher in the drug exposed group (Drug exposed: 98.4 vs. non-exposed: 86.2, p=.04). The correlation between the CBCL and the PSI at 30 months was Spearman’s Rho=.46, p=.01). Conclusions: Child behavior problems and parenting stress were significantly higher in the group of IUDE children as compared to non-drug exposed children. Caregivers who reported high parenting stress levels were also more likely to report a behavior problem in their child. Implications: Future interventions for IUDE children should include parent education in behavior management to potentially reduce parenting stress.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffectiveness of Home Nurse Intervention for Child Behavior and Parenting Stress in Drug Exposed Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155731-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effectiveness of Home Nurse Intervention for Child Behavior and Parenting Stress in Drug Exposed Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Butz, Arlene, ScD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Johns Hopkins University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">abutz@jhmi.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To discuss the effectiveness of a nurse home intervention for in-utero drug exposed children in decreasing the number of children with emotional/behavioral problems at age 24-48 months. Design: Randomized, clinical trial suing repeat measures. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: 111 in-utero drug exposed (IUDE) children recruited from newborn nursery at a large urban hospital from December 1994 through November 1996 and 34 non drug exposed children followed through December 2000. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Child emotional and behavioral problems and parenting stress. Methods: This randomized clinical trial tested the effectiveness of a home nurse intervention in intervention (INT, n=54) versus Control (CON, n=57) children and compared outcomes with a group of non-drug exposed mothers (NONEXP, n=34). The home intervention consisted of 16 home visits over an 18-month period to provide health monitoring of the infant, parenting education and caregiver emotional support. Instrument included Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Parenting Stress Index (PSI). Findings: Subjects were primarily African American (98%), living with biological mother (72%), and type of in-utero drug exposure (IUDE) was primarily cocaine + opiates (58%), cocaine only (21%) and opiates only (21%). IUDE children were significantly more likely to have a behavior problem than non-drug exposed children (p=.02). Mean parenting stress scores (PSI) was significantly higher in the drug exposed group (Drug exposed: 98.4 vs. non-exposed: 86.2, p=.04). The correlation between the CBCL and the PSI at 30 months was Spearman&rsquo;s Rho=.46, p=.01). Conclusions: Child behavior problems and parenting stress were significantly higher in the group of IUDE children as compared to non-drug exposed children. Caregivers who reported high parenting stress levels were also more likely to report a behavior problem in their child. Implications: Future interventions for IUDE children should include parent education in behavior management to potentially reduce parenting stress.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:07:16Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:07:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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