Predictive Validity of the Long-Term Medication Behavior Self-Efficacy Scale: An International Validation Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155733
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictive Validity of the Long-Term Medication Behavior Self-Efficacy Scale: An International Validation Study
Abstract:
Predictive Validity of the Long-Term Medication Behavior Self-Efficacy Scale: An International Validation Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Denhaerynck, Kris
P.I. Institution Name:Catholic University of Leuven
Objective: Self-efficacy refers to a person’s degree of confidence in successfully performing a behavior. Self-efficacy is an important determinant of health behavior and can be targeted for intervention. Nonadherence with medication regimen is a major public health problem due to increased morbidity, mortality, and health care costs, especially in chronic patient populations. We developed the Long-Term Medication Behavior Self-Efficacy Scale (LTMBSE-scale), a 27-item instrument with item scores from 1 (very little confidence in performing a presented situation) to 5 (quite a lot confidence). The purpose of this study was to determine the predictive validity of the LTMBSE-scale using pooled data studies from 6 international studies. Design, Population, Sample: The 1014 subjects included in this study participated in descriptive or experimental research projects using the LTMBSE-scale. As the scale was used in Belgian, Dutch, and American research, the original Dutch scale had to be translated in French an English. There were 46% Dutch speaking, 47% English, and 7% French speaking patients. Transplant patients, hyperlipidemia and AIDS/HIV patients accounted for 45%, 43% and 12% of the sample respectively. Mean age was 54 years, 79% of the sample consisted of men. Variables, Methods: Predictive validity of the scale was determined by assessing the relation between self-efficacy scores and compliance parameters using logistic regression for self-reported compliance data (n = 1014) and using spearman correlation for electronically monitored ‘taking compliance’ (n = 239). Taking compliance is the amount of doses taken divided by the amount of doses prescribed. Findings: Every item but one predicted compliance as assessed by self-report (a < 0.5). The relationship between self-efficacy items and taking compliance was significant for 10 items. Nevertheless, predictive power was low. Determination coefficients of univariate regression analyses predicting self-reported adherence ranged from 0.7% to 6.4%, correlations of individual items with taking compliance ranged from 0.12 to 0.19. These low predictive values can be attributed to a ceiling effect (the mean self-efficacy score is 4.8), impeding respondent differentiation. Conclusions: Although self-efficacy is regarded as a major determinant of health behavior, the week predictive validity of the scale could be explained by the fact (1) routine medication intake precludes a high influence of self-efficacy on actual performance in the absence of negative feedback; (2) included items may be not sufficiently challenging for the patients. Implications: Further psychometric testing of the scale in patients starting a medication regimen should be a valuable approach. If necessary, the variety of item responses could be enhanced by looking for more challenging items or item formulation, and by adapting the scaling-technique.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictive Validity of the Long-Term Medication Behavior Self-Efficacy Scale: An International Validation Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155733-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictive Validity of the Long-Term Medication Behavior Self-Efficacy Scale: An International Validation Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Denhaerynck, Kris</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Catholic University of Leuven</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kris.denhaerynck@med.kuleuven.</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Self-efficacy refers to a person&rsquo;s degree of confidence in successfully performing a behavior. Self-efficacy is an important determinant of health behavior and can be targeted for intervention. Nonadherence with medication regimen is a major public health problem due to increased morbidity, mortality, and health care costs, especially in chronic patient populations. We developed the Long-Term Medication Behavior Self-Efficacy Scale (LTMBSE-scale), a 27-item instrument with item scores from 1 (very little confidence in performing a presented situation) to 5 (quite a lot confidence). The purpose of this study was to determine the predictive validity of the LTMBSE-scale using pooled data studies from 6 international studies. Design, Population, Sample: The 1014 subjects included in this study participated in descriptive or experimental research projects using the LTMBSE-scale. As the scale was used in Belgian, Dutch, and American research, the original Dutch scale had to be translated in French an English. There were 46% Dutch speaking, 47% English, and 7% French speaking patients. Transplant patients, hyperlipidemia and AIDS/HIV patients accounted for 45%, 43% and 12% of the sample respectively. Mean age was 54 years, 79% of the sample consisted of men. Variables, Methods: Predictive validity of the scale was determined by assessing the relation between self-efficacy scores and compliance parameters using logistic regression for self-reported compliance data (n = 1014) and using spearman correlation for electronically monitored &lsquo;taking compliance&rsquo; (n = 239). Taking compliance is the amount of doses taken divided by the amount of doses prescribed. Findings: Every item but one predicted compliance as assessed by self-report (a &lt; 0.5). The relationship between self-efficacy items and taking compliance was significant for 10 items. Nevertheless, predictive power was low. Determination coefficients of univariate regression analyses predicting self-reported adherence ranged from 0.7% to 6.4%, correlations of individual items with taking compliance ranged from 0.12 to 0.19. These low predictive values can be attributed to a ceiling effect (the mean self-efficacy score is 4.8), impeding respondent differentiation. Conclusions: Although self-efficacy is regarded as a major determinant of health behavior, the week predictive validity of the scale could be explained by the fact (1) routine medication intake precludes a high influence of self-efficacy on actual performance in the absence of negative feedback; (2) included items may be not sufficiently challenging for the patients. Implications: Further psychometric testing of the scale in patients starting a medication regimen should be a valuable approach. If necessary, the variety of item responses could be enhanced by looking for more challenging items or item formulation, and by adapting the scaling-technique.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:07:23Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:07:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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