2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155740
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Approaches to Working with Families of Siblings of Disabled Children
Abstract:
Approaches to Working with Families of Siblings of Disabled Children
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Gelmann, Gloria
P.I. Institution Name:Seton Hall University
Research Problem: Little attention has been given to sibling experiences as the family adjusts to coping with a neurologically/physically-impaired child. A better understanding of the experiences of siblings should assist nurses interested in relationships in families as they assist them in adjusting to a changed situation. Purpose: To describe the experiences of siblings in a family when a previously healthy child suffers the onset of a chronic illness or severe injury requiring initial hospitalization has a prognosis of long-term rehabilitation and home care. Method: The researcher has completed two studies on the nature of the impact of hospitalization of a disabled child on well siblings. The first study was an exploratory, descriptive, quantitative study to identify similarities and trends as well as differences in behaviors of well siblings of neurologically impaired children to explore specific needs of this population. Data were collected through direct observations, using the Aschenbach and Parent Direct Observation Behavior Checklist and structured interviews. Descriptive statistics and frequency distributions were used to describe all data obtained from the study sample. The second study was done to investigate the experiences of siblings in a family when a previously healthy child suffers the onset of a chronic illness or severe injury requiring initial hospitalization, and has a prognosis of long-term rehabilitation and home care. The design of the second study was a qualitative, exploratory, descriptive study using a phenomenological approach to explore the experiences of a well child having a chronically ill sibling who was initially hospitalized. This approach was based on the philosophical work of Merleau-Ponty and the phenomenological method of van Manen. Utilization of van Manen’s phenomenological method facilitates obtaining a description of the lived experiences of this study’s participants. In-depth interviews were approximately one hour long or as long as it took for a sibling to share his or her experiences. All interviews were tape recorded in order that the researcher could remember what was said and also use for clarification with the participants. The researcher observed, documented, and interpreted attributes, patterns, characteristics, and meanings of specific and contextual features of the phenomena under study, to aid her in understanding the experiences. Population/Sample: The sample for the first quantitative study consisted of 50 well siblings, age 5-16, from English speaking families who are living in the home. The sample for the second phenomenological study consisted 10 well siblings, age 5-16, from English speaking families. Children from both studies were recruited from a large children’s rehabilitation hospital in New Jersey. Findings/Conclusions: In the quantitative study problems were classified according to clusters, which revealed both internalized and externalized difficulties. Through listening to the experience of the siblings in the qualitative study, the researcher began to understand the nature of their transaction with themselves and with their family and surroundings. Implications: Using the findings of both studies can improve understanding of experiences of well siblings as they influence family relationships and in turn affect nursing practice. A better understanding of these experiences should assist professionals interested in developing effective nursing models of interventions. Such interventions could enable families with handicapped children to develop better coping strategies and lead more normal lives.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleApproaches to Working with Families of Siblings of Disabled Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155740-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Approaches to Working with Families of Siblings of Disabled Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gelmann, Gloria</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seton Hall University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gelmangl@shu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Research Problem: Little attention has been given to sibling experiences as the family adjusts to coping with a neurologically/physically-impaired child. A better understanding of the experiences of siblings should assist nurses interested in relationships in families as they assist them in adjusting to a changed situation. Purpose: To describe the experiences of siblings in a family when a previously healthy child suffers the onset of a chronic illness or severe injury requiring initial hospitalization has a prognosis of long-term rehabilitation and home care. Method: The researcher has completed two studies on the nature of the impact of hospitalization of a disabled child on well siblings. The first study was an exploratory, descriptive, quantitative study to identify similarities and trends as well as differences in behaviors of well siblings of neurologically impaired children to explore specific needs of this population. Data were collected through direct observations, using the Aschenbach and Parent Direct Observation Behavior Checklist and structured interviews. Descriptive statistics and frequency distributions were used to describe all data obtained from the study sample. The second study was done to investigate the experiences of siblings in a family when a previously healthy child suffers the onset of a chronic illness or severe injury requiring initial hospitalization, and has a prognosis of long-term rehabilitation and home care. The design of the second study was a qualitative, exploratory, descriptive study using a phenomenological approach to explore the experiences of a well child having a chronically ill sibling who was initially hospitalized. This approach was based on the philosophical work of Merleau-Ponty and the phenomenological method of van Manen. Utilization of van Manen&rsquo;s phenomenological method facilitates obtaining a description of the lived experiences of this study&rsquo;s participants. In-depth interviews were approximately one hour long or as long as it took for a sibling to share his or her experiences. All interviews were tape recorded in order that the researcher could remember what was said and also use for clarification with the participants. The researcher observed, documented, and interpreted attributes, patterns, characteristics, and meanings of specific and contextual features of the phenomena under study, to aid her in understanding the experiences. Population/Sample: The sample for the first quantitative study consisted of 50 well siblings, age 5-16, from English speaking families who are living in the home. The sample for the second phenomenological study consisted 10 well siblings, age 5-16, from English speaking families. Children from both studies were recruited from a large children&rsquo;s rehabilitation hospital in New Jersey. Findings/Conclusions: In the quantitative study problems were classified according to clusters, which revealed both internalized and externalized difficulties. Through listening to the experience of the siblings in the qualitative study, the researcher began to understand the nature of their transaction with themselves and with their family and surroundings. Implications: Using the findings of both studies can improve understanding of experiences of well siblings as they influence family relationships and in turn affect nursing practice. A better understanding of these experiences should assist professionals interested in developing effective nursing models of interventions. Such interventions could enable families with handicapped children to develop better coping strategies and lead more normal lives.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:07:48Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:07:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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