2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155741
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Needs and Service Utilization of Female Juvenile Offenders
Abstract:
Health Needs and Service Utilization of Female Juvenile Offenders
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Goren, Suzanne, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:
Objective: The objectives of this study were to (a) gain information about the identified health problems of incarcerated female juvenile offenders, and (b) investigate their utilization of the post-release health related services to which they were referred. Design: Descriptive Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Subjects were 139 adolescent females, aged 13-18 years, incarcerated in the Juvenile Detention Center of the Seattle Department of Youth Services (DYS) between Sept. 1998 and May 1999. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Demographics (age, race, insurance coverage, # of children/current pregnancy); health problems identified at assessment, current medications, referral to community-based providers, follow-up appointments kept/not kept. Methods: Medical records review; follow-up phone calls to health care providers. Findings: Initial health screening was done by DYS (juvenile justice) staff. Subjects were not seen by a nurse or other health professional unless they requested an appointment or a health problem had been noted at the assessment. Subjects’ contact with health professionals was also limited by short stays in detention (2 - 7 days average). Services provided on –site included pre-natal care, STD screens, treatment for gastritis, colds, injuries, etc. 19 subjects (14%) were pregnant, 9 already had children. 47% of subjects reported having health insurance; 46% had none or didn’t know if they were covered. Post - release referrals were made for asthma, pre-natal care, STDs, caries, and substance abuse and mental health problems including depression and suicidal ideation. 31% of post-release appointments were kept; 20% were not kept. The largest category among those not kept was for mental health problems. 49% of referrals could not be tracked (agency personnel did not respond to requests for information or reported the client was unknown to them). Conclusions: Juvenile offenders have been called “the forgotten children in health care”. This characterization is supported by the inadequacies in the assessment, treatment, and service coordination identified in this study. Implications: The female adolescents in this study are prime candidates for inadequately treated, serious health problems (and in addition for multiple pregnancies), and for the early death associated with high-risk behaviors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Needs and Service Utilization of Female Juvenile Offendersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155741-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Needs and Service Utilization of Female Juvenile Offenders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Goren, Suzanne, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sgoren@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The objectives of this study were to (a) gain information about the identified health problems of incarcerated female juvenile offenders, and (b) investigate their utilization of the post-release health related services to which they were referred. Design: Descriptive Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Subjects were 139 adolescent females, aged 13-18 years, incarcerated in the Juvenile Detention Center of the Seattle Department of Youth Services (DYS) between Sept. 1998 and May 1999. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Demographics (age, race, insurance coverage, # of children/current pregnancy); health problems identified at assessment, current medications, referral to community-based providers, follow-up appointments kept/not kept. Methods: Medical records review; follow-up phone calls to health care providers. Findings: Initial health screening was done by DYS (juvenile justice) staff. Subjects were not seen by a nurse or other health professional unless they requested an appointment or a health problem had been noted at the assessment. Subjects&rsquo; contact with health professionals was also limited by short stays in detention (2 - 7 days average). Services provided on &ndash;site included pre-natal care, STD screens, treatment for gastritis, colds, injuries, etc. 19 subjects (14%) were pregnant, 9 already had children. 47% of subjects reported having health insurance; 46% had none or didn&rsquo;t know if they were covered. Post - release referrals were made for asthma, pre-natal care, STDs, caries, and substance abuse and mental health problems including depression and suicidal ideation. 31% of post-release appointments were kept; 20% were not kept. The largest category among those not kept was for mental health problems. 49% of referrals could not be tracked (agency personnel did not respond to requests for information or reported the client was unknown to them). Conclusions: Juvenile offenders have been called &ldquo;the forgotten children in health care&rdquo;. This characterization is supported by the inadequacies in the assessment, treatment, and service coordination identified in this study. Implications: The female adolescents in this study are prime candidates for inadequately treated, serious health problems (and in addition for multiple pregnancies), and for the early death associated with high-risk behaviors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:07:51Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:07:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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