Do Women with Increased Risk of Osteoporosis use Hormone Replacement Therapy?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155742
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Do Women with Increased Risk of Osteoporosis use Hormone Replacement Therapy?
Abstract:
Do Women with Increased Risk of Osteoporosis use Hormone Replacement Therapy?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Hundrup, Yrsa
P.I. Institution Name:Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology
Background: Osteoporosis represents a major health problem in the Western world because of the fractures that arise in relation to this disease. Osteoporosis is defined as a reduction in bone mass, coupled with a disorder of bone microarchitecture that predisposes to fracture. Recently an expert panel convened by the World Health Organization suggested that osteoporosis be defined when bone mineral density levels in women fell more than 2.5 SD below the young normal mean. According to this definition, estimates from Europe suggest that around 23% of women aged 50 years and above have osteoporosis. Studies have suggested a number of risk factors of osteoporosis including age, sex, race, history of fractures in the family, previous fractures of any kind, a body mass index (BMI)<20 and reproductive factors such as a short fertile period, and Nulliparae. Life-style factors such as inadequate calcium nutrition, smoking, alcohol abuse coffee consumption, and sedentary life-style are also known risk factors for osteoporotic fractures. Studies have shown that postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy may reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures with 40-50%. The protective effect seems to increase with duration of use but tends to diminish rapidly after discontinuation. Purpose of the Study: The purpose of this study is to determine whether women in risk of osteoporosis are more likely to use HRT for a longer period than women without this risk. The study is a cross-sectional study based on data from postal questionnaires. The survey was carried out in 1993 and it includes all Danish female nurses above the age of 45 years and in membership of the Danish Nurses Organization. In this study the cohort is restricted to nurses aged 50-69, in total 14,865 persons. Variables Studied: The outcome variable was ever use of HRT. Ever use of HRT included women who had used HRT in the past or were currently using it. Ever users were compared to never users. Biological risk factors of osteoporosis were: previous fractures, family history of osteoporosis, BMI<20, a late menarche, and nulliparae. Intermediate variables were: Use of vitamins and calcium supplements, intake of mild and milk-products, intake of coffee, intake of alcohol, physical activity, and smoking habits. Methods: A block recursive graphical model was used to analyze the association between risk factors of osteoporosis and use of HRT and between risk factors and life-style variables and Cox’s regression analysis was used to examine the importance of risk factors on the duration of use of HRT. Main Results: Nurses with a known history of osteoporosis used HRT more frequently than nurses without this history. No other direct associations were found between biological risk factors and ever use of HRT. The presence of other biological risk factors of osteoporosis was not consistently modified by a healthier life-style. On the contrary, we found that women with a low BMI were more likely to have ever smoked and they consumed more often alcohol than women not at risk.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDo Women with Increased Risk of Osteoporosis use Hormone Replacement Therapy?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155742-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Do Women with Increased Risk of Osteoporosis use Hormone Replacement Therapy?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hundrup, Yrsa</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yah@dike.dk</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Osteoporosis represents a major health problem in the Western world because of the fractures that arise in relation to this disease. Osteoporosis is defined as a reduction in bone mass, coupled with a disorder of bone microarchitecture that predisposes to fracture. Recently an expert panel convened by the World Health Organization suggested that osteoporosis be defined when bone mineral density levels in women fell more than 2.5 SD below the young normal mean. According to this definition, estimates from Europe suggest that around 23% of women aged 50 years and above have osteoporosis. Studies have suggested a number of risk factors of osteoporosis including age, sex, race, history of fractures in the family, previous fractures of any kind, a body mass index (BMI)&lt;20 and reproductive factors such as a short fertile period, and Nulliparae. Life-style factors such as inadequate calcium nutrition, smoking, alcohol abuse coffee consumption, and sedentary life-style are also known risk factors for osteoporotic fractures. Studies have shown that postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy may reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures with 40-50%. The protective effect seems to increase with duration of use but tends to diminish rapidly after discontinuation. Purpose of the Study: The purpose of this study is to determine whether women in risk of osteoporosis are more likely to use HRT for a longer period than women without this risk. The study is a cross-sectional study based on data from postal questionnaires. The survey was carried out in 1993 and it includes all Danish female nurses above the age of 45 years and in membership of the Danish Nurses Organization. In this study the cohort is restricted to nurses aged 50-69, in total 14,865 persons. Variables Studied: The outcome variable was ever use of HRT. Ever use of HRT included women who had used HRT in the past or were currently using it. Ever users were compared to never users. Biological risk factors of osteoporosis were: previous fractures, family history of osteoporosis, BMI&lt;20, a late menarche, and nulliparae. Intermediate variables were: Use of vitamins and calcium supplements, intake of mild and milk-products, intake of coffee, intake of alcohol, physical activity, and smoking habits. Methods: A block recursive graphical model was used to analyze the association between risk factors of osteoporosis and use of HRT and between risk factors and life-style variables and Cox&rsquo;s regression analysis was used to examine the importance of risk factors on the duration of use of HRT. Main Results: Nurses with a known history of osteoporosis used HRT more frequently than nurses without this history. No other direct associations were found between biological risk factors and ever use of HRT. The presence of other biological risk factors of osteoporosis was not consistently modified by a healthier life-style. On the contrary, we found that women with a low BMI were more likely to have ever smoked and they consumed more often alcohol than women not at risk.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:07:55Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:07:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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