Fostering Reflective Practice in Experienced and Novice Nurses Transitioning to Perioperative Clinical Roles

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155743
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fostering Reflective Practice in Experienced and Novice Nurses Transitioning to Perioperative Clinical Roles
Abstract:
Fostering Reflective Practice in Experienced and Novice Nurses Transitioning to Perioperative Clinical Roles
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Kuiper, Ruth
P.I. Institution Name:Winston-Salem State University
Objectives: Fostering reflective practice can guide and support practitioners at any level to mature into new decision making patterns when confronted with new clinical roles. The first aim of the study was to describe the extent that reflection with self-regulated learning strategies could be promoted during the clinical experiences of experienced and novice nurses during a perioperative internship. The second aim was to determine if there were any changes in reflective practice over time. The third aim of the study was to determine if there were any differences in reflective practice between experienced and novice nurses. Design: A comparative descriptive design was used to examine data written in journals by experienced and novice nurses in a perioperative internship program. Population, Sample, Setting: The sample consisted of 10 experienced nurses and 16 novice nurses participating in a clinical internship for transition into the perioperative area of an acute care hospital in the southeastern region of the United States. Their mean age was 32.4 years. Three 9-week internships were sampled from the spring of 1999 through the Fall of 2000. Concepts: Self-regulation learning strategies were used as prompts for reflective clinical journaling after each week’s experiences. The self-regulated learning strategies included metacognitive self-evaluation, behavioral self-monitoring and environmental structuring adapted from and described in the self-regulation learning model by Schunk and Zimmerman (1994). Methods: The two subsets of nurses responded to the self-regulated learning prompts in a journal after each clinical week, for 9 weeks. Measurements also included a demographic questionnaire. Findings: There were a total of 204 separate journal entries with an approximate count of 38,800 words. Qualitative analysis using the verbal protocol technique revealed the majority of noun referents as metacognitive. Observations over time revealed changes in rank for the use of thinking strategies, relationships with the environment and significance of situations for both experienced and novice nurses. Assertional analysis revealed present tense verbs used most frequently with primarily connotative phrases. Cognitive operator analysis of journal narratives revealed all strategies of the self-regulated learning model with behavioral self-monitoring used 55% of the time. Script analysis revealed the common themes of knowledge work observations, thinking strategy observations, self-improvement judgments, self-competence judgments, self-reactions, self-correction strategies, judgments of resources, and judgments of social interactions. Conclusions: Self-regulated learning strategies promoted the reflective practice of experienced and novice nurses during these perioperative internships. Metacognitive self-evaluation and environmental structuring were significant strategies for all subjects. Implications: Verbal protocol technique is a qualitative method that can be used to discover metacognitive processes surrounding prompted reflection. The data suggests that nurse educators and preceptors consider self-regulated learning prompts with new hirees to promote reflective practice. Future research is needed to describe prompted reflective practice for longer periods of time and with nurses from different clinical areas. The continued development of the self-regulated learning model in nursing could serve as a guide for pedagogical strategies to promote learning and career development.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFostering Reflective Practice in Experienced and Novice Nurses Transitioning to Perioperative Clinical Rolesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155743-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Fostering Reflective Practice in Experienced and Novice Nurses Transitioning to Perioperative Clinical Roles</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kuiper, Ruth</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Winston-Salem State University</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: Fostering reflective practice can guide and support practitioners at any level to mature into new decision making patterns when confronted with new clinical roles. The first aim of the study was to describe the extent that reflection with self-regulated learning strategies could be promoted during the clinical experiences of experienced and novice nurses during a perioperative internship. The second aim was to determine if there were any changes in reflective practice over time. The third aim of the study was to determine if there were any differences in reflective practice between experienced and novice nurses. Design: A comparative descriptive design was used to examine data written in journals by experienced and novice nurses in a perioperative internship program. Population, Sample, Setting: The sample consisted of 10 experienced nurses and 16 novice nurses participating in a clinical internship for transition into the perioperative area of an acute care hospital in the southeastern region of the United States. Their mean age was 32.4 years. Three 9-week internships were sampled from the spring of 1999 through the Fall of 2000. Concepts: Self-regulation learning strategies were used as prompts for reflective clinical journaling after each week’s experiences. The self-regulated learning strategies included metacognitive self-evaluation, behavioral self-monitoring and environmental structuring adapted from and described in the self-regulation learning model by Schunk and Zimmerman (1994). Methods: The two subsets of nurses responded to the self-regulated learning prompts in a journal after each clinical week, for 9 weeks. Measurements also included a demographic questionnaire. Findings: There were a total of 204 separate journal entries with an approximate count of 38,800 words. Qualitative analysis using the verbal protocol technique revealed the majority of noun referents as metacognitive. Observations over time revealed changes in rank for the use of thinking strategies, relationships with the environment and significance of situations for both experienced and novice nurses. Assertional analysis revealed present tense verbs used most frequently with primarily connotative phrases. Cognitive operator analysis of journal narratives revealed all strategies of the self-regulated learning model with behavioral self-monitoring used 55% of the time. Script analysis revealed the common themes of knowledge work observations, thinking strategy observations, self-improvement judgments, self-competence judgments, self-reactions, self-correction strategies, judgments of resources, and judgments of social interactions. Conclusions: Self-regulated learning strategies promoted the reflective practice of experienced and novice nurses during these perioperative internships. Metacognitive self-evaluation and environmental structuring were significant strategies for all subjects. Implications: Verbal protocol technique is a qualitative method that can be used to discover metacognitive processes surrounding prompted reflection. The data suggests that nurse educators and preceptors consider self-regulated learning prompts with new hirees to promote reflective practice. Future research is needed to describe prompted reflective practice for longer periods of time and with nurses from different clinical areas. The continued development of the self-regulated learning model in nursing could serve as a guide for pedagogical strategies to promote learning and career development.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:07:58Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:07:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.