Biopharmaceuticals Utilized in Treating Victims of Biological, Chemical, and Nuclear Terrorism: Arkansas' Social and Economic Readiness

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155745
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Biopharmaceuticals Utilized in Treating Victims of Biological, Chemical, and Nuclear Terrorism: Arkansas' Social and Economic Readiness
Abstract:
Biopharmaceuticals Utilized in Treating Victims of Biological, Chemical, and Nuclear Terrorism: Arkansas' Social and Economic Readiness
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Persell, Deborah J., MSN, RN, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:Arkansas State University
Title:Asst. Prof. of Nursing
Co-Authors:Charlotte Young, RN, PhD
The purpose of this study was to assess the readiness of health care professionals to administer appropriate biopharmaceuticals in case of a terrorist attack in Arkansas. A stratified randomized questionnaire asked several important research questions: 1) What is the effect of the health care professional's knowledge on the prescribing, dispensing and administration of biopharmaceuticals at potential sites of terrorism in Arkansas; 2) What are the availability and costs of essential biopharmaceuticals related to the care of victims of terrorism in the state of Arkansas; and, 3) How have healthcare professionals in the state of Arkansas responded to the Arkansas Department of Health and Centers for Disease Control's efforts to educate about smallpox vaccine? A total of 268 completed questionnaires from four specified regions of Arkansas were returned. Of the respondents 159 were registered nurses, 46 physicians, 40 pharmacists and 22 nurse practitioners. Statistically the sample was representative of the professions and every region of the state and showed no statistical differences between regions and answers provided. Sixty-nine to 86% indicated they were not at all prepared to administer, dispense or prescribe the pharmaceuticals. Ninety percent do not have confidence that the federal drug stockpile would be sufficient to meet the needs of their patients in a terrorist emergency. Only 4% believe the pharmaceuticals are available in their communities. Almost 7% of the respondents are aware of the costs. Three percent have increased the amount of available pharmaceuticals. Seventeen percent of those offered the smallpox vaccine accepted it, with most citing contraindications and concern for safety as a reason for refusal. Twenty-six percent have participated in continuing education on terrorism. One hundred twenty-one did not answer any of the knowledge questions correctly. Despite the ongoing educational efforts since September 11, health care professionals still feel ill prepared to provide basic care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBiopharmaceuticals Utilized in Treating Victims of Biological, Chemical, and Nuclear Terrorism: Arkansas' Social and Economic Readinessen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155745-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Biopharmaceuticals Utilized in Treating Victims of Biological, Chemical, and Nuclear Terrorism: Arkansas' Social and Economic Readiness</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Persell, Deborah J., MSN, RN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arkansas State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Asst. Prof. of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dpersell@astate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Charlotte Young, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to assess the readiness of health care professionals to administer appropriate biopharmaceuticals in case of a terrorist attack in Arkansas. A stratified randomized questionnaire asked several important research questions: 1) What is the effect of the health care professional's knowledge on the prescribing, dispensing and administration of biopharmaceuticals at potential sites of terrorism in Arkansas; 2) What are the availability and costs of essential biopharmaceuticals related to the care of victims of terrorism in the state of Arkansas; and, 3) How have healthcare professionals in the state of Arkansas responded to the Arkansas Department of Health and Centers for Disease Control's efforts to educate about smallpox vaccine? A total of 268 completed questionnaires from four specified regions of Arkansas were returned. Of the respondents 159 were registered nurses, 46 physicians, 40 pharmacists and 22 nurse practitioners. Statistically the sample was representative of the professions and every region of the state and showed no statistical differences between regions and answers provided. Sixty-nine to 86% indicated they were not at all prepared to administer, dispense or prescribe the pharmaceuticals. Ninety percent do not have confidence that the federal drug stockpile would be sufficient to meet the needs of their patients in a terrorist emergency. Only 4% believe the pharmaceuticals are available in their communities. Almost 7% of the respondents are aware of the costs. Three percent have increased the amount of available pharmaceuticals. Seventeen percent of those offered the smallpox vaccine accepted it, with most citing contraindications and concern for safety as a reason for refusal. Twenty-six percent have participated in continuing education on terrorism. One hundred twenty-one did not answer any of the knowledge questions correctly. Despite the ongoing educational efforts since September 11, health care professionals still feel ill prepared to provide basic care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:08:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:08:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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