The Effects of Stigma on the Sex Risk Behavior of Rural Men who have Sex with Men

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155760
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Stigma on the Sex Risk Behavior of Rural Men who have Sex with Men
Abstract:
The Effects of Stigma on the Sex Risk Behavior of Rural Men who have Sex with Men
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Preston, Deborah, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Pennsylvania State University
Title:Associate Professor
Objectives: (1) to describe the sexual risk behaviors of rural MSM; (2) to evaluate the impact of stigma on these risk behaviors; (3) to evaluate a theory-based model to determine the combined effect of mental health status, stigma, and access to health care on these behaviors. Design: A cross-sectional survey design was employed. Sample: A convenience sample of 100 MSM residing in rural Pennsylvania was accessed through their social networks and political activities. Rural residence was established by asking respondents their county of residence and ZIP code. Determinations were made using Census definitions. Respondents ranged in age from 18 to 69. Most were Caucasian (95%) and employed full time (80%). Twenty-four percent had completed high school or trade school while 33 percent had completed college. One third had lived in their current community all of their lives and 28% had lived in a city and moved back. Nearly one-quarter were “closeted” and thought by most people to be heterosexual. Variables: Measures of sexual risk, mental health status (self-esteem, depression, internalized homophobia), stigma (attitudes about HIV and sexual orientation of family and friends, health care providers and the rural community) and access to health care were employed to fulfill the objectives of the study. Methods: Respondents completed a 12-page questionnaire and were assured of anonymity. Confirmatory factor analysis using LISREL 8.30 was conducted to test the theoretical model. Findings: In terms of level of risk, 23% of the respondents were at no risk, 29% were at low risk, 26% were at moderate risk and 22% were classified as at high risk. Stigma was significantly related to mental health factors. Mental health factors were related to risk behavior. Conclusions: These results suggest an indirect relationship between stigma and MSM sexual risk behavior that is mediated by mental health status. Implications: Implications for health care providers, especially nurses who are the largest group of health care providers in rural areas are discussed. These concern: nursings’ role in providing unbiased prevention education, HIV screening and health care to rural MSM; and increasing sensitivity to privacy issues for MSM in rural communities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Stigma on the Sex Risk Behavior of Rural Men who have Sex with Menen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155760-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Stigma on the Sex Risk Behavior of Rural Men who have Sex with Men</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Preston, Deborah, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Pennsylvania State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dqp@psu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: (1) to describe the sexual risk behaviors of rural MSM; (2) to evaluate the impact of stigma on these risk behaviors; (3) to evaluate a theory-based model to determine the combined effect of mental health status, stigma, and access to health care on these behaviors. Design: A cross-sectional survey design was employed. Sample: A convenience sample of 100 MSM residing in rural Pennsylvania was accessed through their social networks and political activities. Rural residence was established by asking respondents their county of residence and ZIP code. Determinations were made using Census definitions. Respondents ranged in age from 18 to 69. Most were Caucasian (95%) and employed full time (80%). Twenty-four percent had completed high school or trade school while 33 percent had completed college. One third had lived in their current community all of their lives and 28% had lived in a city and moved back. Nearly one-quarter were &ldquo;closeted&rdquo; and thought by most people to be heterosexual. Variables: Measures of sexual risk, mental health status (self-esteem, depression, internalized homophobia), stigma (attitudes about HIV and sexual orientation of family and friends, health care providers and the rural community) and access to health care were employed to fulfill the objectives of the study. Methods: Respondents completed a 12-page questionnaire and were assured of anonymity. Confirmatory factor analysis using LISREL 8.30 was conducted to test the theoretical model. Findings: In terms of level of risk, 23% of the respondents were at no risk, 29% were at low risk, 26% were at moderate risk and 22% were classified as at high risk. Stigma was significantly related to mental health factors. Mental health factors were related to risk behavior. Conclusions: These results suggest an indirect relationship between stigma and MSM sexual risk behavior that is mediated by mental health status. Implications: Implications for health care providers, especially nurses who are the largest group of health care providers in rural areas are discussed. These concern: nursings&rsquo; role in providing unbiased prevention education, HIV screening and health care to rural MSM; and increasing sensitivity to privacy issues for MSM in rural communities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:08:56Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:08:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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