2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155761
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Determinants of Healthy Eating Among Midlife and Older Rural Women
Abstract:
Determinants of Healthy Eating Among Midlife and Older Rural Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Pullen, Carol
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Objective: The purpose of the study was to determine the extent to which cognitive/perceptual factors (perceived self-efficacy for healthy eating, perceived benefits of healthy eating and perceived barriers to healthy eating) and stage of readiness for change explain healthy eating behavior among midlife and older rural women as reflected in adherence to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (Food Guide Pyramid). The U.S. Healthy People 2010 Objectives provide an action agenda that is used nationally to focus efforts on addressing the most significant preventable threats to health; the nutrition objective is to promote health and reduce chronic disease associated with diet and weight. Design: The study employed a descriptive correlational design. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The target population was midlife and older rural women, who are high-priority targets for lifestyle behavior change interventions because they are at increasing health risk. The national convenience sample included 371 women aged 34 to 86 (X=63.8+10.1 years) from U.S. rural areas at a 1998 national meeting of a family and community education organization. Variables Studied Together: Healthy eating was operationalized as adherence to the U.S. Food Guide Pyramid recommendations for daily servings of food groups. Determinants of healthy eating were selected from two models of health behavior change. Perceived self-efficacy, benefits of and barriers to health behavior change are considered to be of major motivational significance within the Health Promotion Model (Pender, 1996). Stage of readiness for health behavior change is a key concept within the Transtheoretical Model (Prochaska & Di Clemente, 1982). Methods: Items to measure healthy eating were extracted from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey, an epidemiological survey conducted annually in the U.S. Perceived benefits and barriers were measured by the Healthy Eating Benefits/Barriers Scales; self-efficacy by the Eating Habits Confidence Survey; and stages of readiness for change in fat reduction, fruit & vegetable intake, and grain products intake by the Stage of Eating Adherence Questionnaire. All measures demonstrated adequate validity and reliability. The questionnaire packet was administered in a single large group during the conference. Findings: Adherence to recommendations for each of the pyramid groups and the total pyramid were used as six separate criterion variables in hierarchical regression analyses. Cognitive/perceptual (CP) variables were entered in a first block and appropriate stage of readiness for change (SOC) variables were entered in a second block. CP variables explained 19% of variance in total pyramid adherence and from 2% to 21% of variance in specific food groups adherence; SOC variables explained an additional 5% of variance in total pyramid adherence and from 2% to 12% of additional variance in specific food groups adherence. Determinant variables that made an independent contribution to the explanation of one or more indicators of healthy eating were self-efficacy (betas from .14 to .29) and stage of change (betas from .15 to .38). Conclusions: Self-efficacy for healthy eating and stage of readiness for change in healthy eating are the most important determinants of midlife and older women’s adherence to the Dietary Guidelines. Implications: Assessment data concerning self-efficacy and stage of change for healthy eating can be used in designing individualized dietary lifestyle change interventions. Interventions should be employed to enhance low self-efficacy. There should be different interventions for rural women at each stage of readiness for change; positive reinforcement can be provided for those food groups where women are adherent, and intensive intervention can be used for groups where women are non-adherent.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeterminants of Healthy Eating Among Midlife and Older Rural Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155761-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Determinants of Healthy Eating Among Midlife and Older Rural Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pullen, Carol</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">chpullen@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of the study was to determine the extent to which cognitive/perceptual factors (perceived self-efficacy for healthy eating, perceived benefits of healthy eating and perceived barriers to healthy eating) and stage of readiness for change explain healthy eating behavior among midlife and older rural women as reflected in adherence to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (Food Guide Pyramid). The U.S. Healthy People 2010 Objectives provide an action agenda that is used nationally to focus efforts on addressing the most significant preventable threats to health; the nutrition objective is to promote health and reduce chronic disease associated with diet and weight. Design: The study employed a descriptive correlational design. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The target population was midlife and older rural women, who are high-priority targets for lifestyle behavior change interventions because they are at increasing health risk. The national convenience sample included 371 women aged 34 to 86 (X=63.8+10.1 years) from U.S. rural areas at a 1998 national meeting of a family and community education organization. Variables Studied Together: Healthy eating was operationalized as adherence to the U.S. Food Guide Pyramid recommendations for daily servings of food groups. Determinants of healthy eating were selected from two models of health behavior change. Perceived self-efficacy, benefits of and barriers to health behavior change are considered to be of major motivational significance within the Health Promotion Model (Pender, 1996). Stage of readiness for health behavior change is a key concept within the Transtheoretical Model (Prochaska &amp; Di Clemente, 1982). Methods: Items to measure healthy eating were extracted from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey, an epidemiological survey conducted annually in the U.S. Perceived benefits and barriers were measured by the Healthy Eating Benefits/Barriers Scales; self-efficacy by the Eating Habits Confidence Survey; and stages of readiness for change in fat reduction, fruit &amp; vegetable intake, and grain products intake by the Stage of Eating Adherence Questionnaire. All measures demonstrated adequate validity and reliability. The questionnaire packet was administered in a single large group during the conference. Findings: Adherence to recommendations for each of the pyramid groups and the total pyramid were used as six separate criterion variables in hierarchical regression analyses. Cognitive/perceptual (CP) variables were entered in a first block and appropriate stage of readiness for change (SOC) variables were entered in a second block. CP variables explained 19% of variance in total pyramid adherence and from 2% to 21% of variance in specific food groups adherence; SOC variables explained an additional 5% of variance in total pyramid adherence and from 2% to 12% of additional variance in specific food groups adherence. Determinant variables that made an independent contribution to the explanation of one or more indicators of healthy eating were self-efficacy (betas from .14 to .29) and stage of change (betas from .15 to .38). Conclusions: Self-efficacy for healthy eating and stage of readiness for change in healthy eating are the most important determinants of midlife and older women&rsquo;s adherence to the Dietary Guidelines. Implications: Assessment data concerning self-efficacy and stage of change for healthy eating can be used in designing individualized dietary lifestyle change interventions. Interventions should be employed to enhance low self-efficacy. There should be different interventions for rural women at each stage of readiness for change; positive reinforcement can be provided for those food groups where women are adherent, and intensive intervention can be used for groups where women are non-adherent.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:08:59Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:08:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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