The Effects of Low Intensity Exercise on Functional Recovery of Acutely Ill Elders

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155762
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Low Intensity Exercise on Functional Recovery of Acutely Ill Elders
Abstract:
The Effects of Low Intensity Exercise on Functional Recovery of Acutely Ill Elders
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Roberts, Beverly, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: During hospitalization, many elderly adults experience functional decline characterized by increasing dependence in activities of daily living (ADL) and abnormalities in gait that are related to decreases in muscle strength. Although the positive effects of exercise are widely accepted, exercise has not been tested for its effects on recovery of muscle strength after acute illness and hospitalization. The purpose of this paper is to describe the effects of a program of low intensity exercise (consisting of muscle strengthening, range of motion, and aerobic exercises) on recovery of muscle strength in acutely ill elders. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Sample: 94 women and 36 men, 70 years and older (M = 77.8 years; range = 70 to 91) who were hospitalized and dependent in no more than 3 ADLs during hospitalization or 2 or more instrumental ADLs prior to admission were randomized to control (N=67) and experimental (N=63) groups. Variables: Muscle strength was assessed in kilograms by dynomometry for hip (extensors and flexors), knee (flexors and extensors), and ankle (dorsi flexors and plantar flexors). To insure that all muscle groups contributed equally to an aggregate score of lower extremity strength, individual muscle group scores were standardized, and summed. Also, comorbidity was assessed with the Charlson Index, and information about length of stay (LOS) and physical therapy (PT) after discharge were extracted from the medical record. Methods: Within 3 days of admission to hospital, muscle strength was assessed, and again at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks later. After controlling for comorbidity, LOS and PT, individual regression analysis was used to obtain unstandardized regression coefficients (b) to determine the pattern of change over time (slope) for each subject, and ANCOVA was used to assess whether these slopes were different between the control and experimental groups. Findings: Control subjects had significantly greater LOS than experimental subjects (M = 7.12 days; SD = 6.6 and M = 4.74 days; SD = 2.7, respectively), but no significant differences were detected for comorbidity or PT. After controlling for comorbidity, LOS, and PT, frail elders who participated in low intensity exercise significantly improved (M (slope) = 1.80; SD = 2.8) their muscle strength more quickly than did those in the control group (M (slope) = .03; SD = 3.7), whose muscle strength changed little during the 12-weeks. Conclusions: Among frail elders recovering from hospitalization, a program of low intensity exercise significantly increased recovery of muscle strength while controlling for comorbidity, LOS, and PT after discharge. Implications: Low intensity exercise is a safe and low cost program that may also improve functional recovery and independence that are dependent on muscle strength of the lower extremities. This program has the potential to facilitate recovery after hospitalization for acutely ill frail elders and can easily be incorporated into a discharge plan of care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Low Intensity Exercise on Functional Recovery of Acutely Ill Eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155762-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Low Intensity Exercise on Functional Recovery of Acutely Ill Elders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Roberts, Beverly, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">blr4@po.cwru.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: During hospitalization, many elderly adults experience functional decline characterized by increasing dependence in activities of daily living (ADL) and abnormalities in gait that are related to decreases in muscle strength. Although the positive effects of exercise are widely accepted, exercise has not been tested for its effects on recovery of muscle strength after acute illness and hospitalization. The purpose of this paper is to describe the effects of a program of low intensity exercise (consisting of muscle strengthening, range of motion, and aerobic exercises) on recovery of muscle strength in acutely ill elders. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Sample: 94 women and 36 men, 70 years and older (M = 77.8 years; range = 70 to 91) who were hospitalized and dependent in no more than 3 ADLs during hospitalization or 2 or more instrumental ADLs prior to admission were randomized to control (N=67) and experimental (N=63) groups. Variables: Muscle strength was assessed in kilograms by dynomometry for hip (extensors and flexors), knee (flexors and extensors), and ankle (dorsi flexors and plantar flexors). To insure that all muscle groups contributed equally to an aggregate score of lower extremity strength, individual muscle group scores were standardized, and summed. Also, comorbidity was assessed with the Charlson Index, and information about length of stay (LOS) and physical therapy (PT) after discharge were extracted from the medical record. Methods: Within 3 days of admission to hospital, muscle strength was assessed, and again at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks later. After controlling for comorbidity, LOS and PT, individual regression analysis was used to obtain unstandardized regression coefficients (b) to determine the pattern of change over time (slope) for each subject, and ANCOVA was used to assess whether these slopes were different between the control and experimental groups. Findings: Control subjects had significantly greater LOS than experimental subjects (M = 7.12 days; SD = 6.6 and M = 4.74 days; SD = 2.7, respectively), but no significant differences were detected for comorbidity or PT. After controlling for comorbidity, LOS, and PT, frail elders who participated in low intensity exercise significantly improved (M (slope) = 1.80; SD = 2.8) their muscle strength more quickly than did those in the control group (M (slope) = .03; SD = 3.7), whose muscle strength changed little during the 12-weeks. Conclusions: Among frail elders recovering from hospitalization, a program of low intensity exercise significantly increased recovery of muscle strength while controlling for comorbidity, LOS, and PT after discharge. Implications: Low intensity exercise is a safe and low cost program that may also improve functional recovery and independence that are dependent on muscle strength of the lower extremities. This program has the potential to facilitate recovery after hospitalization for acutely ill frail elders and can easily be incorporated into a discharge plan of care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:09:02Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:09:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.