2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155763
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors That Attract And Deter Nurses As Administrators
Abstract:
Factors That Attract And Deter Nurses As Administrators
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Rudan, Vincent
P.I. Institution Name:Lehman College
Objective: The overall objective of the research was to identify factors that attract and deter graduate nurses to seek positions in nursing administration. There were two specific aims of the research: 1) to identify reasons that graduate nurses report as attracting or deterring them into positions of administrations2) to identify strategies for nurse educators and administrators to recruit graduate nurses into the field of administration. Design: Survey research. Population Sample, Setting: Data were collected on 120 graduate nursing students in administrative and non-administrative positions using researcher-made surveys. Demographic data were collected. Most respondents were female (98%), between the ages of 25-50 and ethnically diverse: Caucasian (40%), African American (38%) and Asian (22%). Of the 120 respondents, 18 held administrative positions and the remaining 102 were in clinical or educational positions. Methods: Researcher-made surveys were administered to graduate nursing students from two graduate schools of nursing. Findings: Graduate nursing students gave the following reasons for their lack of interest in administration: lack of support from their manager, inflexible hours, lack of clinical experience with patients and their families, expectations of the job and lack of financial rewards. Respondents gave the following reasons for being attracted to nursing administration: ability to control clinical practice, good role models and mentors in administration, self?improvement efforts supported by management and good financial rewards including salary and fringe benefits in top management positions. Conclusions: Through focus groups of graduate nursing students, nurse administrators and nurse educators, the following recommendations were proposed: establish a forecasting work group in nursing schools and health care agencies to identify nursing demands/requirements and the administrative span of control to meet the required work force challenges; academic institutions need to create a new architecture for preparation of nurse administrators to include an emphasis on fiscal management, customer satisfaction, relationship management and managed care; and improved collaboration between nursing education and nursing service administration. Implications: The implications of this research is to improve the impending nursing workforce shortage of nursing administrators, increase the enrollment in graduate nursing administrative programs and to increase the number of nurses seeking management positions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors That Attract And Deter Nurses As Administratorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155763-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors That Attract And Deter Nurses As Administrators</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rudan, Vincent</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lehman College</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">prof157@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The overall objective of the research was to identify factors that attract and deter graduate nurses to seek positions in nursing administration. There were two specific aims of the research: 1) to identify reasons that graduate nurses report as attracting or deterring them into positions of administrations2) to identify strategies for nurse educators and administrators to recruit graduate nurses into the field of administration. Design: Survey research. Population Sample, Setting: Data were collected on 120 graduate nursing students in administrative and non-administrative positions using researcher-made surveys. Demographic data were collected. Most respondents were female (98%), between the ages of 25-50 and ethnically diverse: Caucasian (40%), African American (38%) and Asian (22%). Of the 120 respondents, 18 held administrative positions and the remaining 102 were in clinical or educational positions. Methods: Researcher-made surveys were administered to graduate nursing students from two graduate schools of nursing. Findings: Graduate nursing students gave the following reasons for their lack of interest in administration: lack of support from their manager, inflexible hours, lack of clinical experience with patients and their families, expectations of the job and lack of financial rewards. Respondents gave the following reasons for being attracted to nursing administration: ability to control clinical practice, good role models and mentors in administration, self?improvement efforts supported by management and good financial rewards including salary and fringe benefits in top management positions. Conclusions: Through focus groups of graduate nursing students, nurse administrators and nurse educators, the following recommendations were proposed: establish a forecasting work group in nursing schools and health care agencies to identify nursing demands/requirements and the administrative span of control to meet the required work force challenges; academic institutions need to create a new architecture for preparation of nurse administrators to include an emphasis on fiscal management, customer satisfaction, relationship management and managed care; and improved collaboration between nursing education and nursing service administration. Implications: The implications of this research is to improve the impending nursing workforce shortage of nursing administrators, increase the enrollment in graduate nursing administrative programs and to increase the number of nurses seeking management positions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:09:05Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:09:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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