Patterns of Work-Centered Relationship Between a Nongovernmental Organization, Its Field Staff, and Refugee Staff

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155766
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patterns of Work-Centered Relationship Between a Nongovernmental Organization, Its Field Staff, and Refugee Staff
Abstract:
Patterns of Work-Centered Relationship Between a Nongovernmental Organization, Its Field Staff, and Refugee Staff
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Solheim, Karen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: The purpose of this research was to describe patterns of relationship between an American nongovernmental organization (NGO), its field staff, primarily nurses, and refugees as they interacted in a work-centered relationship (WCR) in a refugee camp. Design: This was a qualitative descriptive single case study. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The case was the relationship that occurred between an American NGO, its field staff, and a group of approximately 400 internally displaced persons (IDP) as they worked together in a refugee camp at the Thai-Cambodian border between 1979 and 1992-93. Concept Studied: The key phenomenon for study was the work-centered relationship that occurred in the community comprised of the NGO, field staff, and refugee staff. Relationship, key to nursing, shapes self-perception, helps people find meaning, and relationship between nurses and communities affects health. Relationship as it occurs between NGOs, field staff, and refugees, is significant because of the large number of NGOs (at least 50,000) that interact with refugees (at least 27 million). Further, refugees name relationship with NGOs and staff as important and NGOs enact relationship with employed refugees in a various ways. Methods: Data were gathered from in-depth interviews with NGO leaders (N=4), including nurse leaders, and from organizational documents (>200). Measures, such as member checking, were taken to insure trustworthiness. Data analysis, guided by a conceptual framework of relationship in community and a study definition of relationship, employed a systematic process of content analysis. Findings: Results depicted a strong relationship among the NGO, its field staff, and refugees that endured in a particularly harsh circumstance. Prominent relational patterns were refugee self-reliance, advocacy, and the relationship as for refugees. As a result of this particular WCR over 400 refugees delivered effective health care to a camp of up to 85,000 people over a 13-year period with the assistance of a total of 235 field staff (122 RNs). Conclusions: Comparison of the study relationship to the range of all possible relationships in community allowed concluding that this WCR was congruent with many of the ideals outlined in the conceptual framework. Relationship was valued for its own sake, refugee needs for growth, agency, and fulfillment were integrated, and refugees’ humanity was recognized. Implications: As a result of this study, the concept of relationship in community has been explicated and effectively applied to guide research. This study affirmed the nursing value of relationship, provided a unique and powerful illustration of nursing relationship with a community, and calls upon nurses and others to bring relationship in community to the center of any human endeavor.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatterns of Work-Centered Relationship Between a Nongovernmental Organization, Its Field Staff, and Refugee Staffen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155766-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patterns of Work-Centered Relationship Between a Nongovernmental Organization, Its Field Staff, and Refugee Staff</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Solheim, Karen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">solheikd@uwec.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this research was to describe patterns of relationship between an American nongovernmental organization (NGO), its field staff, primarily nurses, and refugees as they interacted in a work-centered relationship (WCR) in a refugee camp. Design: This was a qualitative descriptive single case study. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The case was the relationship that occurred between an American NGO, its field staff, and a group of approximately 400 internally displaced persons (IDP) as they worked together in a refugee camp at the Thai-Cambodian border between 1979 and 1992-93. Concept Studied: The key phenomenon for study was the work-centered relationship that occurred in the community comprised of the NGO, field staff, and refugee staff. Relationship, key to nursing, shapes self-perception, helps people find meaning, and relationship between nurses and communities affects health. Relationship as it occurs between NGOs, field staff, and refugees, is significant because of the large number of NGOs (at least 50,000) that interact with refugees (at least 27 million). Further, refugees name relationship with NGOs and staff as important and NGOs enact relationship with employed refugees in a various ways. Methods: Data were gathered from in-depth interviews with NGO leaders (N=4), including nurse leaders, and from organizational documents (&gt;200). Measures, such as member checking, were taken to insure trustworthiness. Data analysis, guided by a conceptual framework of relationship in community and a study definition of relationship, employed a systematic process of content analysis. Findings: Results depicted a strong relationship among the NGO, its field staff, and refugees that endured in a particularly harsh circumstance. Prominent relational patterns were refugee self-reliance, advocacy, and the relationship as for refugees. As a result of this particular WCR over 400 refugees delivered effective health care to a camp of up to 85,000 people over a 13-year period with the assistance of a total of 235 field staff (122 RNs). Conclusions: Comparison of the study relationship to the range of all possible relationships in community allowed concluding that this WCR was congruent with many of the ideals outlined in the conceptual framework. Relationship was valued for its own sake, refugee needs for growth, agency, and fulfillment were integrated, and refugees&rsquo; humanity was recognized. Implications: As a result of this study, the concept of relationship in community has been explicated and effectively applied to guide research. This study affirmed the nursing value of relationship, provided a unique and powerful illustration of nursing relationship with a community, and calls upon nurses and others to bring relationship in community to the center of any human endeavor.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:09:15Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:09:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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