Promoting Sleep of Infants with Severe Sleep Problems and Mental Health of their Parents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155767
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Promoting Sleep of Infants with Severe Sleep Problems and Mental Health of their Parents
Abstract:
Promoting Sleep of Infants with Severe Sleep Problems and Mental Health of their Parents
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Thome, Marga
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iceland
Objective: The purpose of the paper is to present a research program consisting of three studies with the aim to promote sleep in infants with severe sleep problems and to improve mental health of their parents. First Study: The first study arose in response to absence of health services for infants with severe sleep problems in Iceland. Severely sleep disturbed infants were customary hospitalized if services at health centers and/or pediatricians failed to intervene effectively. The purpose of the study was to test the effectiveness of a pediatric nursing intervention for hospitalized severely sleep-disturbed infants and to examine the effect of the intervention on sleep patterns of the infant and on the mental health of parents. Severity of the problem was determined by the parents' perspective on the impact it had on their life and on the well-being of the infant. Self-report measures were taken before and after the intervention: Mental health of parents was measured as follows: 1. Fatigue and resulting symptom distress, 2. Parental Stress, 3. State-Trait anxiety and 4. Depressive Symptoms. Infant day/ night sleep patterns, self-soothing habits and capacities, reactions of parents to sleep-disturbances and reaction of infants to change and to parents' responses were assessed by an interview with parents and by a sleep-diary kept over one week. The clinical sample consisted of 35 infants with a mean age of one year who were hospitalized for sleep problems in the City Hospital of Reykjavik in from 1997-98. 33 mothers and 30 fathers participated in the study with written, informed consent. Infants received a brief intervention with a focus on supporting their self-soothing capacities. Parents were supported by the nurse in carrying out the intervention that was tailored to the individual infant and its family. Both parents took responsibility in carrying out changes at home. The majority of parents needed two treatment sessions. Sessions lasted for an hour on the mean. Results showed significant improvement of infant sleep patterns in regard to reduced night-waking, less time in settling for sleep, longer circadian mean sleep and more regularity of day-sleep patterns. Both parents experienced a high degree of distress before admission. Two months after discharge parental distress was significantly decreased and there was no significant difference between mothers and fathers. Reduction of parental distress over time in response to clinically significant improvement of infant sleep habits indicates that parental distress constitutes an emotional response to infant sleep problems rather than pathological aetiology. Second Study: The second study arose in response to re-organization of health service for severely sleep disturbed infants and their parents that was transferred to an outpatient clinic at the City Hospital Reykjavik in January 1997. The purpose of the study was on the one hand to test the validity of the above intervention in a different care-system and on the other hand to review existing classification of infant sleep problems with regard to presented clinical material. Interviews with parents were computer-recorded immediately after assessment and a sample of 194 records was analyzed by content. Existing classifications (NANDA, IDC 0-3) were found to be valid, but rather general. Suggestions for modifications will be presented. Third Study: The third study is current and has two goals: 1. To follow up the clinical sample from the first study in order to examine the long-term effect of the intervention on sleep at pre-school age and on the parents´ mental health. 2. To compare sleep patterns and emotional state of parents in the clinical sample with a randomly selected population sample. Preliminary results will be reported.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePromoting Sleep of Infants with Severe Sleep Problems and Mental Health of their Parentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155767-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Promoting Sleep of Infants with Severe Sleep Problems and Mental Health of their Parents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thome, Marga</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iceland</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">marga@hi.is</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of the paper is to present a research program consisting of three studies with the aim to promote sleep in infants with severe sleep problems and to improve mental health of their parents. First Study: The first study arose in response to absence of health services for infants with severe sleep problems in Iceland. Severely sleep disturbed infants were customary hospitalized if services at health centers and/or pediatricians failed to intervene effectively. The purpose of the study was to test the effectiveness of a pediatric nursing intervention for hospitalized severely sleep-disturbed infants and to examine the effect of the intervention on sleep patterns of the infant and on the mental health of parents. Severity of the problem was determined by the parents' perspective on the impact it had on their life and on the well-being of the infant. Self-report measures were taken before and after the intervention: Mental health of parents was measured as follows: 1. Fatigue and resulting symptom distress, 2. Parental Stress, 3. State-Trait anxiety and 4. Depressive Symptoms. Infant day/ night sleep patterns, self-soothing habits and capacities, reactions of parents to sleep-disturbances and reaction of infants to change and to parents' responses were assessed by an interview with parents and by a sleep-diary kept over one week. The clinical sample consisted of 35 infants with a mean age of one year who were hospitalized for sleep problems in the City Hospital of Reykjavik in from 1997-98. 33 mothers and 30 fathers participated in the study with written, informed consent. Infants received a brief intervention with a focus on supporting their self-soothing capacities. Parents were supported by the nurse in carrying out the intervention that was tailored to the individual infant and its family. Both parents took responsibility in carrying out changes at home. The majority of parents needed two treatment sessions. Sessions lasted for an hour on the mean. Results showed significant improvement of infant sleep patterns in regard to reduced night-waking, less time in settling for sleep, longer circadian mean sleep and more regularity of day-sleep patterns. Both parents experienced a high degree of distress before admission. Two months after discharge parental distress was significantly decreased and there was no significant difference between mothers and fathers. Reduction of parental distress over time in response to clinically significant improvement of infant sleep habits indicates that parental distress constitutes an emotional response to infant sleep problems rather than pathological aetiology. Second Study: The second study arose in response to re-organization of health service for severely sleep disturbed infants and their parents that was transferred to an outpatient clinic at the City Hospital Reykjavik in January 1997. The purpose of the study was on the one hand to test the validity of the above intervention in a different care-system and on the other hand to review existing classification of infant sleep problems with regard to presented clinical material. Interviews with parents were computer-recorded immediately after assessment and a sample of 194 records was analyzed by content. Existing classifications (NANDA, IDC 0-3) were found to be valid, but rather general. Suggestions for modifications will be presented. Third Study: The third study is current and has two goals: 1. To follow up the clinical sample from the first study in order to examine the long-term effect of the intervention on sleep at pre-school age and on the parents&acute; mental health. 2. To compare sleep patterns and emotional state of parents in the clinical sample with a randomly selected population sample. Preliminary results will be reported.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:09:19Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:09:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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