2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155768
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Race/Culture on Self-care Behavior and Perception of Health
Abstract:
The Effect of Race/Culture on Self-care Behavior and Perception of Health
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Wang, Chen-Yen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Hawaii at Manoa
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: The ultimate purpose was to identify the predictors of diabetes self-care. Objectives were to examine: (1) predicted probability of ethnic diversity in diabetes self-care behavior (DSC), (2) impact of culture-related variables on DSC, (3) differences in DSC among the Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. Design: a descriptive correlational design. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Subjects were adult men and women diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes and whose diabetes management regimen included an oral medication to control their blood glucose level. Subjects in Taiwan were recruited through their response to flyers on the bulletin boards of selected pharmacies or by answering advertisements in a local newspaper. In Korea, subjects were recruited in the waiting room of a diabetes center. In Okinawa, subjects were recruited from the outpatient centers at a university hospital and at a general hospital. The investigators asked potential subjects directly. Study was carried out between 1997 and 1999. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Race/ethnicity, Culture (measured by sources of seeking health care, living arrangements, affiliated religion, sources of social support, and sources of caregiver), Universal self-care, Diabetes self-care, perception of health. Methods: Subjects who responded to the advertisements, newsletters, flyers, or the investigator's request were interviewed by the principal investigators in Japan, or by two Korean-speaking co-investigators in Korea. After verbal informed consent was obtained, code numbers were assigned for each of the three ethnic groups and subject anonymity was protected. The questionnaires were completed during a single interview with each subject and at the conclusion of the data gathering, the names and addresses of all respondents were destroyed. There were no follow-up letters or telephone calls. The data (in English) were mailed to the principal investigator and entered into the computer. Findings: The mean score of diabetes related self-care behaviors were significantly different among three races, especially in the sources of seeking health care, in types of affiliated religion, and in the sources of social support. Stepwise multiple regressions indicated that types of affiliated religion, sources of support, and race together explained 7.4% of variance in diabetes self-care. Conclusions: Types of affiliated religion, sources of support, and race together only explained 7.4% of variance in diabetes self-care. Findings demonstrated that ethnicity and/or culture influenced diabetes self-care (such as meal plan, preventive behaviors, medication, foot care, and glucose self-monitoring). Implications: 1) Okinawa origin patients tend to believe in natural power and harmony; to perceive receiving support from family; and to have their blood glucose monitoring at outpatient center; 2) Taiwan origin patients tend to believe in various sources of high power; to perceive receiving too much helps from family; and to have their blood glucose monitoring at outpatient center; 3) Korean origin patients tend to perceive receiving too much helps or no helps from family; and to carry out their blood glucose monitoring at home. Nurses may integrate the sources of spiritual, social, and community support into the regimens of diabetes care and other chronic illnesses. Future research should focus on the development of cultural appropriated management programs and their effectiveness.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Race/Culture on Self-care Behavior and Perception of Healthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155768-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Race/Culture on Self-care Behavior and Perception of Health</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wang, Chen-Yen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Hawaii at Manoa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">chenwang@hawaii.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The ultimate purpose was to identify the predictors of diabetes self-care. Objectives were to examine: (1) predicted probability of ethnic diversity in diabetes self-care behavior (DSC), (2) impact of culture-related variables on DSC, (3) differences in DSC among the Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. Design: a descriptive correlational design. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Subjects were adult men and women diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes and whose diabetes management regimen included an oral medication to control their blood glucose level. Subjects in Taiwan were recruited through their response to flyers on the bulletin boards of selected pharmacies or by answering advertisements in a local newspaper. In Korea, subjects were recruited in the waiting room of a diabetes center. In Okinawa, subjects were recruited from the outpatient centers at a university hospital and at a general hospital. The investigators asked potential subjects directly. Study was carried out between 1997 and 1999. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Race/ethnicity, Culture (measured by sources of seeking health care, living arrangements, affiliated religion, sources of social support, and sources of caregiver), Universal self-care, Diabetes self-care, perception of health. Methods: Subjects who responded to the advertisements, newsletters, flyers, or the investigator's request were interviewed by the principal investigators in Japan, or by two Korean-speaking co-investigators in Korea. After verbal informed consent was obtained, code numbers were assigned for each of the three ethnic groups and subject anonymity was protected. The questionnaires were completed during a single interview with each subject and at the conclusion of the data gathering, the names and addresses of all respondents were destroyed. There were no follow-up letters or telephone calls. The data (in English) were mailed to the principal investigator and entered into the computer. Findings: The mean score of diabetes related self-care behaviors were significantly different among three races, especially in the sources of seeking health care, in types of affiliated religion, and in the sources of social support. Stepwise multiple regressions indicated that types of affiliated religion, sources of support, and race together explained 7.4% of variance in diabetes self-care. Conclusions: Types of affiliated religion, sources of support, and race together only explained 7.4% of variance in diabetes self-care. Findings demonstrated that ethnicity and/or culture influenced diabetes self-care (such as meal plan, preventive behaviors, medication, foot care, and glucose self-monitoring). Implications: 1) Okinawa origin patients tend to believe in natural power and harmony; to perceive receiving support from family; and to have their blood glucose monitoring at outpatient center; 2) Taiwan origin patients tend to believe in various sources of high power; to perceive receiving too much helps from family; and to have their blood glucose monitoring at outpatient center; 3) Korean origin patients tend to perceive receiving too much helps or no helps from family; and to carry out their blood glucose monitoring at home. Nurses may integrate the sources of spiritual, social, and community support into the regimens of diabetes care and other chronic illnesses. Future research should focus on the development of cultural appropriated management programs and their effectiveness.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:09:22Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:09:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.