2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155769
Type:
Presentation
Title:
End-of-Life Dependency of Home Care Clients and Hospital Inpatients
Abstract:
End-of-Life Dependency of Home Care Clients and Hospital Inpatients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Wilson, Donna, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alberta
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective. Dying people are often thought to be extensively dependent upon other persons for care. Few investigations, however, have reported the types or extent of end-of-life dependency. This investigation sought to describe the physical dependency of dying persons. Design. Exploratory-descriptive. Population, Sample, Setting, Years. All deceased adult persons who received care during a six month period, from January to June 2000 inclusive, in one large Canadian hospital (n=150) or one of four home care departments within the same city (n=59). Concept or Variables Studied Together. Subject group (hospital, home, and home to hospital), age, gender, marital status, disease(s), home care duration (days from admission to death), hospital stay (days from admission to death), total dependency (days of partial and complete dependency combined), dependency needs, and complete dependency (days of assistance with all activities of daily living). Methods. The health care records of all deceased individuals were accessed on a month-by-month basis to obtain socio-demographic, health, and health care data. Data was then entered into a spreadsheet and analyzed using the SPSS quantitative data analysis computer program. Findings. 35.6% of home care clients died at home. Unmarried females were more likely to die at home, while males were more often hospitalized. Almost all home care clients died of cancer; hospital inpatients died of many different illnesses. The average hospital stay of hospitalized home care clients (7 days) was significantly shorter (p=.000) than the average stay of hospital inpatients (13.8 days). The duration of dependency varied considerably between the 3 groups; hospitalized home care clients had the longest documented total dependency (81.3 days on average). Almost all subjects had dependency needs on admission, with dependency increasing until all were completely dependent, as well as unconsciousness, before death. The length of end-stage complete dependency varied among subjects and between subject groups, although no significant difference in duration of end-stage complete dependency between hospital inpatients (8.3 days on average) and home care clients who died at home was found (4.1 days on average). The types of dependency and progression of dependency were similar among the majority of subjects; from needing assistance with bathing, standing up, and walking to complete care needs. 26% of hospital inpatients developed sudden complete dependency until death. Conclusions. Dying trajectories varied, but dependency when dying was common to all trajectories. While end-stage dependency only lasted a few days, progressive dependency could be of a long duration. Unless end-stage dependency suddenly occurred, dependency was progressive. Implications. Home care support can be designed to anticipate and accommodate changing client needs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnd-of-Life Dependency of Home Care Clients and Hospital Inpatientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155769-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">End-of-Life Dependency of Home Care Clients and Hospital Inpatients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilson, Donna, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alberta</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">donna.wilson@ualberta.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective. Dying people are often thought to be extensively dependent upon other persons for care. Few investigations, however, have reported the types or extent of end-of-life dependency. This investigation sought to describe the physical dependency of dying persons. Design. Exploratory-descriptive. Population, Sample, Setting, Years. All deceased adult persons who received care during a six month period, from January to June 2000 inclusive, in one large Canadian hospital (n=150) or one of four home care departments within the same city (n=59). Concept or Variables Studied Together. Subject group (hospital, home, and home to hospital), age, gender, marital status, disease(s), home care duration (days from admission to death), hospital stay (days from admission to death), total dependency (days of partial and complete dependency combined), dependency needs, and complete dependency (days of assistance with all activities of daily living). Methods. The health care records of all deceased individuals were accessed on a month-by-month basis to obtain socio-demographic, health, and health care data. Data was then entered into a spreadsheet and analyzed using the SPSS quantitative data analysis computer program. Findings. 35.6% of home care clients died at home. Unmarried females were more likely to die at home, while males were more often hospitalized. Almost all home care clients died of cancer; hospital inpatients died of many different illnesses. The average hospital stay of hospitalized home care clients (7 days) was significantly shorter (p=.000) than the average stay of hospital inpatients (13.8 days). The duration of dependency varied considerably between the 3 groups; hospitalized home care clients had the longest documented total dependency (81.3 days on average). Almost all subjects had dependency needs on admission, with dependency increasing until all were completely dependent, as well as unconsciousness, before death. The length of end-stage complete dependency varied among subjects and between subject groups, although no significant difference in duration of end-stage complete dependency between hospital inpatients (8.3 days on average) and home care clients who died at home was found (4.1 days on average). The types of dependency and progression of dependency were similar among the majority of subjects; from needing assistance with bathing, standing up, and walking to complete care needs. 26% of hospital inpatients developed sudden complete dependency until death. Conclusions. Dying trajectories varied, but dependency when dying was common to all trajectories. While end-stage dependency only lasted a few days, progressive dependency could be of a long duration. Unless end-stage dependency suddenly occurred, dependency was progressive. Implications. Home care support can be designed to anticipate and accommodate changing client needs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:09:26Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:09:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.